Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trial" ...

  • Honor Tarnished

    "This year-long series looks into every facet of the often-opaque military justice system. Through more than two dozen stories, the series closely examined military criminal investigations, lab testing, trials, sentences and appeals."
  • "Making a Killing"

    A 26-year-old bipolar student enrolled in a drug trial at the University of Minnesota. However, Carl Elliott reveals that the professors who were ran the study knew that the student was probably "not competent to give his consent" because he suffered from "severe psychotic delusions." He was given a powerful antipsychotic and eventually stabbed himself to death. Elliott is "a professor of medical ethics at the University of Minnesota," and believes that the professors who were running the drug study would profit from it and that the student who committed suicide was "coerced" into participating.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Blood Diamonds

    The story investigated the charge that ex-Liberian President Charles Taylor used blood diamonds to pay for weapons in the way against the neighboring nation of Sierra Leone. The story ultimately forced fashion model Naomi Campbell to testify at Taylor's trial for receiving diamonds from Taylor during a visit to Nelson Mandela's home.
  • "Final Justice

    For seven years, the WEWS-TV Investigative Unit researched and reported the case of a Cleveland man, Darrell Houston, who was serving "33 years to life" in prison. By uncovering new witnesses and interviewing past jurors, the investigation by WEWS eventually led to a new trial, the release of Houston and the exoneration of his "murder and robbery charges."
  • Steamrolled

    The story documents how Houston residents are being exposed to industrial pollution with no protection from state and local regulators. Because Houston does not have zoning laws, industrial plants can be built in residential neighborhoods.
  • Did these women molest two girls?

    The series examines the evidence presented at the trials that convicted four women of sexually assaulting two girls in the 1990s. The story documents the lapses in police work, the flawed credibility of the accusers, a prosecutor's exploitation of anti-gay stereotypes and more.
  • Presumed Guilty

    Over a ten year span, judges in Cuyahoga County, Ohio threw out more than 350 cases mid-trial because prosecutors did not present enough basic evidence. The results of the investigative series shows how the broken system allowed hundreds of defendants to walk free.
  • Killing Fields: Long Road to Justice

    “An investigation of Khmer Rouge tribunal being held in Cambodia and allegations of corruption”. Further, the investigation began with the hunt for Ta Chan who was the chief interrogator and suspected of living in a remote Cambodian village. Also, torture was a daily experience for many of the prisoners being held and resulted in a number of deaths.
  • World's Untold Stories: 25 Years After Midnight

    25 years ago a documentary series traveled to Bhopal, a city which suffered the world’s worst industrial disaster that same day. This series focuses on Bhopal and what has changed and what hasn’t. Also, it looks at the lives of the survivors and many of them have given up their lives to speak out about the disaster. “Their experiences tell a story of survival, determination and hope-as they work to help the victims, and ensure that the world never forgets what happened there”.
  • New Orleans's tech contracting scandal

    Former top mayoral aide, Greg Meffert, was caught in a web of self-dealing and exposed free vacations that the mayor had received. The series “helped the FBI and other federal investigators track the payments and relationships”. Also, it eventually “led to a 63-count federal criminal indictment against Meffert, his wife and the city vendor, Mark St. Pierre”.