Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • "The Costs of the Confederacy" / "Monumental Lies"

    Reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler, along with a team of Type Investigations researchers, spent more than a year investigating public funding for sites—monuments, statues, parks, libraries, museums—and Confederate “heritage” organizations that promote an inaccurate “Lost Cause” version of American history. According to scholars, that ideology distorts the nation’s collective past by venerating Confederate leaders and the common Confederate soldier; framing of the Civil War as a struggle for Southern states’ rights against “northern aggression”; denying Southern culpability and slavery itself for any role in precipitating the war; and presenting chattel slavery as a humane, Christianizing institution. This is more than mere Confederate myth-making, it is a century-and-half old strategy that was historically deployed to terrorize and disenfranchise African American citizens and to reinstall white supremacy across the South in the wake of Reconstruction. The historic sites that perpetuate these myths have been central to racial violence in recent years, from the Dylann Roof shooting at the AME Zion Church — he had visited Confederate sites before his attack — to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, centered around the defense of a Confederate monument.
  • Drilling Down: Big Oil’s Bidding

    When the government awards energy companies the rights to drill for offshore oil and gas, it’s supposed to make sure the American public, which owns the resources, doesn’t get screwed. The government is required by law to use “competitive bidding” and to ensure that taxpayers receive “fair market value.” However, decades of data suggest that the government has been falling down on the job, a Project On Government Oversight analysis found. Among POGO’s discoveries: Instead of taking the trouble to estimate the value of individual offshore tracts, the government has simply labeled many of them worthless and has awarded drilling rights on that basis. Energy companies have invested billions of dollars in tracts the Interior Department categorized as “non-viable”—in other words, worthless. Over the past 20 years, more than two-thirds of the leases that ultimately became energy-producing had been deemed worthless by the Interior Department.
  • NPR/PBS Frontline/Ohio Valley ReSource: Coal's Deadly Dust

    Coal's Deadly Dust asked a fundamental question about an unprecedented epidemic of the advanced stage of black lung disease (Progressive Massive Fibrosis or PMF), among coal miners. How and why did this happen? How could it happen given a regulatory system designed to protect miners from the toxic dust that causes disease? The investigation documented the failure of federal regulators and the mining industry to protect coal miners from the epidemic of disease, despite clear evidence in federal data, clear evidence in mining practices, decades of recommendations to take action, and awareness of the danger.
  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • WSJ: The Fall of Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn, the powerful casino executive considered the creator of modern Las Vegas, was responsible for a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct and harassment toward employees.
  • WRAL: Police and Google

    WRAL investigation finds that Raleigh police have been using Google to find suspects in crimes. They are not gathering information on specific individuals; they are using warrants to obtain information on every Google-equipped cell phone that was within a mile or two of a crime scene. The users have no way to know that their movements are being reviewed by police.
  • WCPO: DNA Delay

    A tip from a rape victim leads WCPO Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to uncover a DNA testing delay at the Kentucky State Crime Lab affecting thousands of new criminal cases, from assaults to rapes to murders, waiting on results to move forward in the justice system. The investigation leads to action from the Kentucky attorney general.
  • VPR: Watch Your Speed

    Law enforcement in Vermont issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in 2017. A quarter were issued in three small towns. This investigation revealed how one county sheriff has profited from his traffic contracts with two of the towns. It also showed how issuing traffic tickets allowed another town to maintain an unusually low tax rate.
  • The Killing Rooms of Mosul

    Mosul’s reconstruction – investigating the continued impact of the worst urban fighting since the Second World War. We wanted to measure the scale of the devastation in Mosul’s Old City and understand what the residents were still going through nine months after the fighting had ended. What we found was a traumatized city with dead bodies still rotting in the open, and buildings containing terrible secrets of violence, death, and possible un-investigated war crimes.