Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • VPR: Watch Your Speed

    Law enforcement in Vermont issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in 2017. A quarter were issued in three small towns. This investigation revealed how one county sheriff has profited from his traffic contracts with two of the towns. It also showed how issuing traffic tickets allowed another town to maintain an unusually low tax rate.
  • The Killing Rooms of Mosul

    Mosul’s reconstruction – investigating the continued impact of the worst urban fighting since the Second World War. We wanted to measure the scale of the devastation in Mosul’s Old City and understand what the residents were still going through nine months after the fighting had ended. What we found was a traumatized city with dead bodies still rotting in the open, and buildings containing terrible secrets of violence, death, and possible un-investigated war crimes.
  • The Daily News: Yellow School Bus Crisis

    This Daily News series dealt with yellow school buses and a crisis that included extensive delays, fraud in hiring bus staffers with criminal pasts, and how bus contracts were awarded.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Wireless Wars: The Fight Over 5G

    One of the largest deployments of wireless technology in decades is occurring as telecommunications companies erect a new network of small cells to support the next generation of wireless communications called 5G. The problem, however, brings these small cells into neighborhoods and business districts, unlike the larger towers seen along highways and in fields far from centers of population. And with it, resistance from citizens. The clash pits telecoms, which want to ease regulations to reduce costs, against local governments and their residents, who want to control the look and placement of the cells and defend revenue and public property rights. The Center reports on how the telecoms are relying on money and tried-and-true relationships with politicians and regulators to get their way. And they are winning.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Abandoned in America

    President Donald Trump has declared the United States’ economy to be “the best economy we've ever had in the history of our country.” His administration likewise declared the nation’s decades-long war on poverty “largely over and a success.” So during the summer of 2018, Center for Public Integrity reporters visited six communities where residents say the crushing effects of poverty and government neglect aren’t improving — they’ve gone from bad to worse. Problems range from broken education systems to unlivable housing to infrastructure fit for the third world. One factor bound them together: a profound lack of political clout on the eve of the 2018 midterm election that would determine the balance of power in Washington. Our work led to the publishing of “Abandoned in America” — a six-part, 27,000-word series published over two weeks during October 2018.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • Still Failing the Frail

    "Still Failing the Frail" is a follow-up to PennLive’s 2016 IRE-award winning series, "Failing the Frail." That six-part series explored major problems in Pennsylvania’s nursing home industry, spurred in part by the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s 2015 lawsuit against Golden Living. In 2018, the lead reporter of that series, Daniel Simmons-Ritchie, wanted to determine what, if any, progress had been made in Pennsylvania’s nursing home sector since the 2015 lawsuit and PennLive’s 2016 series.
  • Stanford University: Wildland Development Escalates California Fire Costs

    The Camp Fire is just the latest mega-fire in California — and the cost of fighting such fires has risen dramatically. California dwarfs other states in fire-suppression costs, an analysis by a Stanford journalism class has found. The Stanford class analyzed daily reports from the most expensive fires in every state from 2014 to 2017, and found that dense development at the border of wildlands — in communities like Paradise, Cobb, and Santa Rosa — helps explain California fires’ exceptional damage and expense to put out.
  • Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund: The Costs of the Confederacy

    Defenders of Confederate memorials often speak of them as history to be preserved. But a project from Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, found that many of these monuments, created by Jim Crow governments, receive substantial taxpayer support in the present. Lead reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler found at least $40 million in public monies over the past decade directed to Confederate sites and organizations that embrace white-supremacist ideologies and suppress or whitewash slavery.
  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.