Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • Police & Race Relations

    This story delves into police and racial profiling in Amarillo. ABC 7 analyzed all traffic stops from 2015 that resulted in a warning or citation by race. We found that blacks had 10 percent of the traffic stops but made up seven percent of the Amarillo population. Hispanics had 40 percent of the traffic stops but make up 29 percent of the population. This story also looks at why the data might not tell the full story. People self-select their race on their driver’s license and the Census, but officers select a driver’s race during a traffic stop. There is also an issue in data collection because “Hispanic” didn’t become a race option for driver’s licenses until 2013. Previously, Hispanics had to select to be Black or White. Because not all licenses are updated but police must report the number of Hispanic drivers stopped each year, officers have to determine a driver’s race.
  • Amarillo Economic Development Corporation Travel Expenses

    This series looks at travel expenses from the Amarillo Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) during a three-year period. The AEDC is mostly funded with taxpayer money with the Amarillo city council approving the almost $2 million operating budget. The findings include luxury hotel expenses, purchases of alcohol, meals at high-end restaurants, late check-out fees and rounds of golf. Some receipts were hand-written, unreadable or not itemized. There is little to no oversight of these expenses either by the organization or the city. The AEDC has no “written” policies on travel and the president approves his own expenses. Many of the meals, trips and rounds of golf are considered an investment, but there is no record of who attended because the AEDC says the deals are confidential. The organization has existed for 26 years but has brought in 34 businesses during that time to Amarillo.
  • Medical Waste

    WVUE’s groundbreaking investigation “Medical Waste” - which uncovered a secretive practice employed by major health insurance companies essentially forcing consumers to pay a premium back to the insurance company for their prescription drugs - led to changes in state law, was the evidentiary backbone of eleven lawsuits, and most importantly educated consumers on how to pay for life-changing medications. http://www.vimeo.com/leezurik/MedicalWasteIREAwardEntry
  • Almighty

    A riveting, chilling tale of how a group of ragtag activists infiltrated one of the most secure nuclear-weapons sites in the United States, told alongside a broader history of America's nuclear stewardship, from the early stages of the Manhattan Project to our country's never-ending investment in nuclear weaponry.
  • Degree of Debt

    “Degree of Debt” is a multi-state investigation by Raycom Media that exposes one of the most crippling impacts on the U.S. economy, the virtual explosion of student debt. The numbers are staggering. Over 41 million students owe a collective $1.4 trillion; a figure that dwarfs credit card and auto loan debt combined. Of that $41 million in debt, nearly 8.1 million of those people are currently in default. According to the Congressional Budget Office, over the next decade the federal government will make $81 billion in profit from student loans, over $8 billion a year. The Raycom investigative series used several federal databases along with shoe leather reporting to educate our viewers/readers on the biggest offenders and what needs to change. http://www.vimeo.com/leezurik/IREDegreeofDebt https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Y09_yQ9Bwo&feature=youtu.be
  • Reliving Agent Orange

    Four decades after the Vietnam War, scientists are still learning how exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange has harmed veterans and their children. This report showed that the Department of Veterans Affairs has hesitated to compensate sick veterans, instead weighing political and financial costs in secret. To bolster their position, they found that government officials have routinely turned to a known skeptic of Agent Orange’s deadly effects – a scientist who has also been paid by the chemical makers. And they obtained internal VA data on hundreds of thousands of vets and conducted a first-of-its-kind analysis, producing new evidence suggesting a connection between Agent Orange and birth defects that experts say should force the government to take action. https://www.propublica.org/article/agent-orange-vietnam-veterans-their-families-share-stories-exposure https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/alvin-young
  • Unsafe at Any Level

    When news broke of the lead water crisis in Flint, Michigan, much of the nation, its political leaders and journalists turned their focus toward this blue collar city an hour’s drive north of Detroit. Reuters journalists M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer turned their attention toward the next Flint, searching for communities facing environmental perils that had not yet come to light.
  • Doctors & Sex Abuse

    Across the United States, sexual abuse of patients by doctors occurs far more often than has been known by the public or acknowledged by the medical profession, according to an investigation by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Regulators have a strong bias to forgive even doctors with egregious violations and return them to practice. The abuse is shrouded in secrecy and accountability is crippled by a poor framework of laws that does not put patient protection at the forefront. In a multi-part series that began July 7 and continues through the end of the year, The AJC revealed a broken culture that echoes scandals in the Catholic Church and Boy Scouts. Because of this broken culture, the medical profession is not addressing the victimization of patients, mostly female, by a powerful and esteemed group of men who, in any other walk of life, would likely lose their jobs and possibly be jailed. http://doctors.ajc.com/table_of_contents/ http://doctors.ajc.com/video_doctors_sex_abuse/ http://doctors.ajc.com/video_sex_abuse_story_details http://doctors.ajc.com/states/minnesota_sex_abuse/
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • Machine Bias

    With our Machine Bias series, we are investigating the algorithms that are increasingly making decisions about our lives, from what news or ads we see online to what sentences are meted out for crimes. Algorithms are often proprietary "black boxes," raising important questions about transparency and due process. By collecting and analyzing the output of these systems, we set out to reverse-engineer and make accountable some of the algorithms that were having the biggest impact on people’s lives. Our investigative methods included linear regression, statistical analysis, and the creation of our own software. Among the series’ findings were evidence of racial bias in risk assessment systems, and the preferential treatment of Amazon’s own products in its so-called open market.