Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • Fire Mutual Aid

    Several years ago tips to our newsroom led to what would be come a multi-year effort. Over the course of the years Action News Investigates uncovered slow fire response times as result of a broken and poorly managed system. In 2015, those investigations told in a station-produced documentary won a 2015 Peabody Award. That was only the beginning. Investigative reporter Paul Van Osdol has continued to stay on top of all fire and EMS response stories in the years that followed. In 2018, those stories were prominent once again. This entry highlights several failed responses to fires that in some case, if more efficient, could have saved lives. The entry also highlights the results of these investigations, a state commission review of local fire departments.
  • Columbus Dispatch: Wanted

    This four-day series examines the more than 5.7 million unserved criminal arrest warrants in the United States. As law enforcement struggles to find and arrest these suspects, who are often wanted for violent crimes including murder and rape, victims wait in fear that their attackers will return.
  • Democrat and Chronicle: Rochester food truck builder burns customers nationwide

    When reporters at the Democrat and Chronicle received a call from a distressed food truck owner who had been burned by a local food truck builder, a quick records check revealed a surprising tally of lawsuits and tax liens for what had been regarded as a prominent local business. That led to a six-month investigation that revealed a business in a downward spiral, bringing down customers across the country as they cut corners on workmanship and accepted deposits of $10,000 to $42,500 and strung customers along for months. The gripping narrative painted a sobering downside to the hot food truck industry.
  • DARK VALLEY

    Please consider the APTN Investigates episode “Dark Valley” which aired October 19, 2018 on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, for the Open Broadcast Feature award. Reporter/Producer Holly Moore and Reporter Rob Smith travelled to the beautiful Okanagan valley in British Columbia in July 2017 and they quickly realized that the incredible landscape held a dark secret. Five women, seemingly unconnected, had gone missing here in just two years. They vanished within an hour’s drive of one another between Vernon and Sicamous, BC.
  • Comfort Women: Ep1. War Crime, Ep2.The Nation Gave Them Up

    For the 73rd anniversary of the National Liberation Day of Korea, this program aims to report the Japanese government’s denial of forced recruitment comfort women and operation of comfort station by the Japanese military during the Japanese ruling of Korea. This program also traces the whereabouts of the 20 Korean comfort women found in Myitkyina, Myanmar, to suggest how to solve the current comfort women issues. Through the recorded voice files of the interrogations of 4 Japanese officers and soldiers, this program analyses their views on comfort women. The program also found out that Japanese military was solely responsible for forced recruitment and control of comfort women, and the establishment and operation of comfort stations through 783 interrogation reports about 1105 Japanese POW during the three years from 1942. Also, the program offers plans on how to solve the comfort women issue such as international solidarity measures by tracing the 20 Korean comfort women that were dragged to Myitkyina, Myanmar, by the Japanese military to find out whether they are still alive or where they have died, and what our government has done for them.
  • Cincinnati Enquirer: 'A child could die'

    An investigation reveals feds were warned more than a dozen times of third-row seat instability problems in Honda Odysseys before the death of Kyle Plush.
  • Chalkbeat and Bridge: The crisis caused by students changing schools

    A detailed examination of a serious education crises that had been largely unknown in Detroit: Parents repeatedly moving their children from one struggling school to the next in an often-futile quest to find better educational options. In a city where school choice policies encourage school shopping, research shows that 1 in 3 elementary school students changes schools every year. Yet few local leaders or policymakers were aware of the high rates of student churn. Even fewer understood the impact that so much movement has on schools and on the ability of students to succeed. Our five-part series, called “Moving Costs,” set out to change that by telling the stories in a single classroom, where the typical student had cycled through four or more schools on the road to eighth grade. It shed light on the turmoil in classrooms where teachers must routinely scramble to accommodate new students, then see them leave mid-year without saying good-bye.
  • Canada's role in innocent man's imprisonment

    This investigative report on the extradition of Hassan Diab to France revealed for the first time the secret efforts Canadian officials went to in order to send an innocent man to a French prison. Diab would spend more than 3 years in near-solitary confinement while he was investigated for a bombing outside a Paris synagogue. Canada went to great lengths to extradite Diab despite warnings that the French case was extremely weak. The French case ultimately fell apart due to flimsy evidence.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Is Texas DPS skewing its border security stats - again?

    Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw went before Congress in April and touted nearly 40,000 arrests stemming from the department’s border surge of troopers in the Rio Grande Valley. The American-Statesman has long held DPS accountable when it comes to its border activities, and especially in how it has described the success of those efforts to lawmakers. With this story, we sought to continue in that watchdog role.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Inside Texas State's Year of Hate

    As a string of neo-Nazi and white supremacist propaganda attacks roiled the Texas State University campus in 2016 and 2017, the administration’s response baffled -- and angered -- many. But it wasn’t until the American-Statesman waged a months-long effort to obtain internal records related to the response that the public learned that university leaders several times chose damage control over action and struggled to form a coherent response or strategy.