Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • Edward Snowden's Guardian Angels

    On June 9, 2013, when Edward Snowden chose Hong Kong as the place where to reveal the massive civil rights abuses by the American intelligence services, he forgot one thing: where to go next. Still, he managed to escape the American agents, the Hong Kong Police and all journalists who were chasing him. This article reveals for the first time how Snowden managed to stay hidden in Hong Kong for two weeks before leaving for Moscow. And it introduces the people who helped him.
  • UA president attempts takeover of for-profit chain ITT Tech

    After nearly a year of reporting on University of Akron President Scott Scarborough, The Devil Strip learned he was negotiating with a for-profit education company for what they suspected was a curriculum deal. Instead, they discovered that company was brokering a deal for the university to take over ITT Tech. The small paper broke this story, which was echoed by several outlets who were shut out of the university. They, meanwhile, had Scarborough on the phone admitting to the negotiations. While the school locked down the information, Sen. Dick Durbin referenced their reporting in an address to President Obama, promising to keep an eye on UA. Soon afterwards, the university abandoned the efforts, Scarborough was removed from office and ITT Tech closed all its campuses.
  • Taking out a Reverse Mortgage Ruined My Life

    Dozens of senior citizens in New York City are caught in a rising tide of reverse- mortgage foreclosures that threaten to put some of the city’s most vulnerable residents out on the street. Because reverse-mortgage borrowers in foreclosure lack the protections — including mandatory settlement conferences and a 90-day notice requirement — instituted for traditional borrowers after the 2010 robo-signing scandal, these seniors are at risk of losing their homes far more quickly than forward-mortgage borrowers, who get an opportunity for negotiations overseen by the court. The debts at issue are relatively small, averaging just $10,000, but can trigger the loss of a home worth thirty times that amount or more.
  • Buffalo Billion

    Investigative Post has been covering the Buffalo Billion since its inception, including a 2014 story on a curiously worded Request for Proposals that appeared to limit the field to one local developer – a major donor to the governor. In late 2015, news broke that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating the awarding of contracts on the biggest Buffalo Billion project – the state’s commitment to spend $750 million to build and equip a factory for SolarCity, a solar panel manufacturer. Investigative Post continued to cover the Buffalo Billion, and similar initiatives in other Upstate cities, throughout 2016.
  • Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan

    For six weeks in the Spring of 2015, award-winning journalist Nick Turse traveled on foot as well as by car, SUV, and helicopter around war-torn South Sudan talking to military officers and child soldiers, United Nations officials and humanitarian workers, civil servants, civil society activists, and internally displaced persons–people whose lives had been blown apart by a ceaseless conflict there. In fast-paced and dramatic fashion, Turse reveals the harsh reality of modern warfare in the developing world and the ways people manage to survive the unimaginable.
  • The Profiteers

    The tale of the Bechtel family dynasty is a classic American business story. It begins with Warren A. “Dad” Bechtel, who led a consortium that constructed the Hoover Dam. From that auspicious start, the family and its eponymous company would go on to “build the world,” from the construction of airports in Hong Kong and Doha, to pipelines and tunnels in Alaska and Europe, to mining and energy operations around the globe. Today Bechtel is one of the largest privately held corporations in the world, enriched and empowered by a long history of government contracts and the privatization of public works, made possible by an unprecedented revolving door between its San Francisco headquarters and Washington. Bechtel executives John McCone, Caspar Weinberger, and George P. Shultz segued from leadership at the company to positions as Director of the CIA, Secretary of Defense, and Secretary of State, respectively. Like all stories of empire building, the rise of Bechtel presents a complex and riveting narrative. In The Profiteers, Sally Denton, whom The New York Times called “a wonderful writer,” exposes Bechtel’s secret world and one of the biggest business and political stories of our time.
  • Rail Crossings Danger

    A CBC News investigation into Canada's top 25 most accident-prone railway crossings found wide-spread design flaws across the country. Some of the most dangerous railway crossings in Canada lack automated gate arms, protective pedestrian gates, advance warning signs, bells and flashing lights. Other deficiencies include poor sightlines for drivers, confusing road signs and overgrown bush. As well, CBC News learned Transport Canada does not routinely warn the public about all railway crossings that appear in its database of the country's 500 "highest risk" crossings.
  • Verizon: Fighting Data Overages

    Many Verizon Wireless customers are being billed for unexplained data overuse. In September, The Plain Dealer wrote about a few people who questioned exorbitant charges. Those stories quickly led to 4,000 Verizon customers from around the country contacting the paper with similar concerns. The reporters have stayed on the story, trying to determine what is wrong. All the while, Verizon says there is no widespread problem with its billing software -- while often erasing the charges that customers complain about.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Shocking Force

    This first-ever data analysis of police use of Tasers revealed that departments across Maryland predominantly used the devices against suspects who, by their own assessment, posed no immediate threat, and showed that officers didn’t follow widely accepted safety recommendations, shocking people for longer than what’s recommended and firing at the chest despite warnings it could cause cardiac arrest.