Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "war" ...

  • Descent into Disorder

    An investigation into the state of Wisconsin's broken juvenile justice system and warning signs that were ignored for years, leaving young inmates injured and guards undertrained, overworked and largely unaccountable.
  • Politics of Pain

    “Politics of Pain,” a multi-part investigation by the Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press, examines the politics behind the nation’s opioid addiction epidemic, with a unique look at how drugmakers and their allies sought to block and delay legislation and thwart other steps intended to combat opioid abuse while pushing their own profitable but unproven remedies. Drug companies and allied advocates spent more than $880 million on lobbying and political contributions at the state and federal level over the past decade, more than eight times what the formidable gun lobby recorded for political activities during the same period. Using a network of paid allies, drugmakers also created an echo chamber that quietly derailed efforts to curb U.S. consumption of the drugs while pushing new, harder-to-abuse formulations of their products that have not been proven to reduce overdose rates.
  • Business of Disaster

    Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast in 2013, but it wasn’t a disaster for everyone. For some, Sandy was big money. This investigation revealed for the first time just how much money insurance companies make during a disaster, and how those companies wielded a taxpayer program into a powerhouse of profit while homeowners suffered.
  • Charlie Foxtrot

    “Charlie Foxtrot” began as an investigation of a military policy that strips service members of their benefits and veteran status, even after serving in war zones. Our coverage culminated with a screening inside the U.S. Capitol alongside members of the U.S. House and Senate. We focused on a piece of proposed legislation with the power to give service members a second chance. Later that week, the U.S. Senate approved that bill. By year’s end, the Act of Congress was signed in to law by the President. https://vimeo.com/198371721/2d8cedd533
  • Neglected Neighbors: How Elderly Housing Policies Fail Connecticut's Most Vulnerable

    Thismulti-part series investigates a decades-old policy that mixes the elderly with disabled residents of any age in the same public housing. Dating back to the bills that established public housing during President Roosevelt’s administration, the definition of “elderly” was defined to include not only people over a certain age, but also people with disabilities. Today, that definition remains, despite decades-worth of government studies that show it to be problematic to house these populations together. Recommendations were made to ease management and social issues, but few were implemented. In Connecticut, legislators have been repeatedly warned about worsening issues by housing authorities and residents. Today, the policy is still in effect, and failing both the elderly and disabled people who live there.
  • It Doesn't Make Cents: Hidden 529 Fees

    A tiny number can make a huge difference in how much you "pay to save" using government-sponsored 529 college savings plans. The D.C. government scrambled to completely overhaul its 529 program after the News 4 I-Team found D.C. residents pay thousands more in fees than parents in neighboring states. The team created a special "529 Calculator" that lets parents type in the age of their child, how much they make and where they live to see a side-by-side comparison of how much they could save in each 529 plan in our region...and how much they end up paying in hidden fees. The seemingly simple mobile-friendly design belies an incredibly complex back-end formula, making it the only calculator of its kind available anywhere on the internet. This calculator helped the team definitively show D.C. parents were getting a raw deal - prompting the D.C. Treasurer's office to fire the plan's administrator and award a new contract less than six weeks after the initial investigation aired - saving D.C. parents hundreds of thousands of dollars previously wasted on hidden and unnecessary fees. Story #1: http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/Avoiding-High-529-Fees-Navigating-College-Savings-Plan-Pitfalls-397010181.html Story #2: http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/DC-Council-Demands-Action-on-College-Savings-Plans-After-I-Team-Report-401179346.html Story #3: http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/DC-Announces-New-Administrator-for-College-Savings-Plans-407522785.html
  • The Turn Toward Tehran

    How secret cash payments helped pave the way for a release of prisoners and new opening to Iran.
  • Bernie Effect

    While Bernie Sanders’ campaign for the Democratic nomination was unsuccessful, did it live on by changing the issues that Hillary Clinton talked about and how she talked about them? Fusion used linguistic analysis to quantify each candidate’s voice on social media. This model accurately reflected the differences among the candidates, and we found no trend in Clinton’s language towards that of Sanders.
  • Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge in Appalachia

    An NPR investigation identified ten times the number of cases of the worst stage of the deadly coal miners' disease black lung as federal researchers reported. NPR's findings indicate Progressive Massive Fibrosis (PMF), as its called, strikes many more miners and at far higher rates than previously recognized. The report comes as the federal program that provides medical benefits and cash payments to miners stricken with black lung is threatened by a multi-billion dollar debt and challenges to ongoing funding.
  • Failure to Protect series

    In a four-day series, The Daily Sentinel examined the killings of three children who were known to the local child-welfare system, as part of a broader examination of the child welfare and foster care systems in the county. The purpose was to inform the public about how the children ended up living with the people who ultimately killed them or were accused of killing them, the warning signs, the fallout that resulted from the deaths, and identify possible changes to the system that could prevent future killings.