Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "water" ...

  • Hell and High Water

    The Houston area is home to 6.5 million people, as well as America’s largest oil refining and petrochemical complex. And it’s a sitting duck for the extreme storms and floods that will become more common as the effects of climate change become more pronounced. So why isn’t Texas — or the federal government — doing more to protect it? https://projects.propublica.org/houston/
  • Bonds & Fees

    Amarillo had a November election that included seven bond issues. The city council also decided to increase water fees over a five-year period. This story explores the total cost to tax payers if all the bonds pass and all the water fees go into effect.
  • Free Water

    It seems like a simple process: you use a service, you pay for the service. But not when you are dealing with the city of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management. Most of this entry focuses on a single fancy condominium's startling water and sewer non-payment history and Atlanta's reaction. But the floodgates opened as the reporters continued digging. After finally receiving records the city didn't want them to see, the reporters found even more shocking multi-million dollar billing mistakes on thousands of other properties.
  • Unsafe at Any Level

    When news broke of the lead water crisis in Flint, Michigan, much of the nation, its political leaders and journalists turned their focus toward this blue collar city an hour’s drive north of Detroit. Reuters journalists M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer turned their attention toward the next Flint, searching for communities facing environmental perils that had not yet come to light.
  • The Wet Prince of Bel Air

    During a time of severe drought, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wanted to learn more about the users of the most water in California. Reporters found that one homeowner in Los Angeles’ posh Bel Air neighborhood had used 11.8 million gallons of water in a single year during a drought emergency and that 4 of the top 10 known mega water users were also in Bel Air. But city officials wouldn’t reveal who those customers were. So in a follow-up story, Reveal used satellite analysis and public records to identify the seven most likely culprits. https://www.revealnews.org/article/the-wet-prince-of-bel-air-who-is-californias-biggest-water-guzzler/
  • Potter County, Pennsylvania: Private & Public Drinking Water Sources Contamination by Illegal Chemicals

    Public Herald broke the story about groundwater and surface water contamination from drilling operations by JKLM Energy in Potter County that impacted private and public water supplies. Since our first breaking report, we have been contacted by residents who informed us that they were not notified that the local groundwater had been contaminated, continued to use their water and experience stomach and digestive pain and discomfort. County officials applaud the industry for being "responsible" despite illegal operations and a refusal by the company to release a full list of chemicals that contaminated water sources.
  • Complaint Report

    After a 30-month analysis, a Public Herald investigation into fracking complaints uncovered 9 ways officials at the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) kept drinking water contamination across Pennsylvania “off the books” since 2004.
  • Bottled Water from a National Forest

    The Desert Sun revealed in a series of investigations that the U.S. Forest Service has been allowing Nestle to pipe water out of a national forest to produce bottled water using a permit that lists an expiration date of 1988. The newspaper found that Forest Service officials failed to follow through on plans for an environmental review that would have assessed whether the use of water for bottling is harming sensitive habitat along a creek. The Desert Sun also obtained records showing the agency hasn’t examined the environmental impacts of hundreds of expired permits that allow for the use of water from national forests.
  • Sea Level Rise

    The Bay Area's current waterfront building frenzy includes at least $21 billion in housing and commercial construction in low-lying areas that climate scientists say could flood by the end of the century. In examining approval processes for new buildings on the edge of San Francisco Bay, our team found that some cities are greenlighting waterfront development without planning for the long term or fully accounting for the future costs of reconfiguring large projects to resist flooding.
  • Abandoned Mine Pollution

    CBS 5 Investigates found radioactive uranium from abandoned mines, leaking into Phoenix's largest drinking water reservoir. That is just one of the findings from our investigation into the toxins left behind at as many 100,000 abandoned mines across the state of Arizona. We collected soil and water samples from ten different locations and had them tested for heavy metals and radioactive materials. Our investigation is ongoing, but so far has prompted the US Forest Service to clean up one of the sites at a cost of more than $300,000, and prompted the state of Arizona to begin an inventory of old mines, in order to figure out which ones pose the most dangers to the environment and human health. http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true