Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "water" ...

  • Sonora River: Massive mine spill continues impact to Sonora River Basin

    One year after the Buenavista del Cobre copper mine spilled 11 million gallons of toxic chemicals into the Sonora River in Mexico, polluting nearly 200 miles of river and threatening the health and livelihood of its residents, the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting highlighted the consequences of an inadequate government response and illegal operations at the mine that led to the spill. Deep reporting illuminates farmers and families still sick from contact with the contaminated water, a government slow to take meaningful action to protect its residents and outdated water quality standards that allow 2.5 times more arsenic than acceptable international norms. https://soundcloud.com/bquester/azcir-sonora-river-radio-preview-with-kpbs
  • Unprepared

    Unprepared was a multi-platform series, culminating in a broadcast documentary, that examined Oregon's failure to prepare for the known risk of a major earthquake. Reporters conducted hundreds of interviews, accessed government documents and built their own databases in a year-long effort that exposed many inadequacies in current seismic preparedness and the state’s lagging response. http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/oregon-earthquake-fuel-breakdown-90-percent/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/earthquake-oregon-coastal-towns-cease-to-exist/ http://www.opb.org/television/programs/ofg/episodes/2701/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/earthquake-oregon-bridges-collapse/ http://www.opb.org/aftershock/ http://www.opb.org/news/widget/oregons-seismic-achilles-heel/ http://www.opb.org/news/widget/unprepared-schools-and-hospitals-at-risk/ http://www.opb.org/news/widget/seismically-vulnerable-bridges-in-oregon/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/oregon-earthquake-fuel-breakdown-90-percent/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/oregon-earthquake-14-gallons-water/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/living-off-your-quake-kit-weekend-wrap-up/ http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/earthquake-what-holds-us-back-from-being-prepared-for-a-disaster/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/new-hospital-planned-in-tsunami-zone/ http://www.opb.org/news/series/unprepared/unprepared-towns-along-coast-manage-tsunami-risk-in-different-ways/
  • The Global Crisis of Vanishing Groundwater

    The historic agreement reached in Paris in December that will curb carbon emissions is heartening, but oil isn’t the only resource being pumped out of the ground at an alarming rate—with catastrophic consequences for the planet. In an eye-opening series for USA Today, The Desert Sun of Palm Springs, CA, and other Gannett newspapers, Pulitzer Center grantees Ian James and Steve Elfers investigate the consequences of groundwater depletion, an overlooked global crisis. “Groundwater is disappearing beneath cornfields in Kansas, rice paddies in India, asparagus farms in Peru and orange groves in Morocco,” writes Ian. “As these critical water reserves are pumped beyond their limits, the threats are mounting for people who depend on aquifers to supply agriculture, sustain economies and provide drinking water. In some areas, fields have already turned to dust and farmers are struggling.” Climate change will only exacerbate the crisis, yet few seem to be taking this existential threat seriously. “Even as satellite measurements have revealed the problem’s severity on a global scale, many regions have failed to adequately address the problem,” says Ian. “Aquifers largely remain unmanaged and unregulated, and water that seeped underground over tens of thousands of years is being gradually used up.”
  • Historic Flood: Houston’s Emergency Response

    Within days of historic flooding that left 8 people dead and parts of Houston devastated, the KPRC investigative team began digging for answers on the city’s emergency response to the hardest hit areas. Our primary focus started with the deaths of 3 citizens who were thrown into raging flood waters when a fire department rescue boat capsized. Our Open Records Request for the boat’s maintenance logs and emergency communications during that rescue yielded a shocking discovery about how unprepared firefighters were for this severe weather event. https://youtu.be/nDKfvSiujpI
  • In North Dakota Oilfield Spill Problems Worsen; State Officials Misrepresent North Dakota’s Spill Problem

    Wastewater - also called saltwater or brine - is a common by product of oil and gas drilling. Wastewater spills are a common occurrence in North Dakota's oilfield. Inside Energy looked into state data to find out HOW common, and then used this analysis when the largest saltwater spill in state history occurred in January of 2015. We found that spills were on the increase, and that state officials regularly downplayed or misrepresented the spills. While oil spills generate headlines, wastewater spills are more devastating and can leave farmland sterile for generations.
  • The War Over Continental Shelves

    Around the Korean peninsular, there are huge continental shelves which potentially possess excess amounts of valuable and natural resources such as gas and oil. In the Joint Development Zone, Korean and Japanese governments acquiesced to share this territory. Despite the agreement between Korea and Japan to develop underwater resources of the region jointly, skeptics have suspicions that when the treaty expires in 2028, the entire zone will become Japan's.
  • Something In The Water

    For years, the state of Texas has said there is no link between water contamination and natural gas drilling. WFAA’s “Something In The Water” series has made it difficult for the state to maintain that stance. Our series, which is still ongoing in 2016, focuses on how a fireball erupted from a rural family’s water well in the Barnett Shale natural gas field. Our investigation found gas drillers not properly cementing their wells to protect underground water, and fudging permitting paperwork with state regulators. Our stories have prompted a board of top EPA scientists to now question whether drilling is linked to contamination. https://vimeo.com/wfaa/review/151843222/9cb971b521
  • Filthy Rio Water a Threat at 2016 Olympics

    AP investigation into pollution levels of the sea and lake waters around Olympic city Rio de Janeiro where thousands of athletes and hundreds of thousands of foreign tourists will be exposed to sewage-laden waters this August. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXzECpf4lEw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t71EpxrOXZw
  • Surviving the Drought: We Investigate California’s Water Crisis

    We investigated California's drought to find out why a state that leads the world in innovation, technology, science and progressive policy can't seem to figure out how to solve a water crisis when other countries around the world can. We asked a simple question: if other countries can do it why can't California? And our months of investigation and interviews with more than 75 scientists, policy makers, innovators, designers, engineers and venture capitalists revealed that the problem of record drought in California isn't as much about lack of rain and snow but about lack of vision and stalemate because of entrenched and intractable policy and history. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwT_GMRuEik http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Surviving-the-Drought-Investigate-California-Water-Crisis-338921102.html
  • Unholy Water

    In a remarkable five-part investigative series, KCBS Reporter Doug Sovern revealed that St. Mary's Cathedral, the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Francisco, was systematically soaking homeless people at night to keep them from sleeping in the church alcoves. Doug discovered and exposed an illegal plumbing system, installed in the middle of the worst drought in California history. Doug's reports prompted action by city officials, the removal of the system, a public apology by the Bishop, and a new homeless initiative by the archdiocese.