Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Dairy farm subsidy program woes

    Atlantic Monthly publishes article on dairy farm subsidy program woes.
  • The Arizona Project

    IRE Arizona Project follows the trail of Arizona Republic reporter Don Bolles' murder and discovers a ubiquitous network of organized crime tainting nearly every aspect of Arizona government and business, including the judiciary, real estate and public works; reveals lively underworld of drug smuggling, gambling and prostitution; investigation yields first documented connection between major heroin producer and organized crime figure. (Supplement: conference, 1985.)
  • Roofing rip-off

    Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette reports on roofing rip-off.
  • Refuse collection abuse

    The Sun (Baltimore) does investigation of refuse collection abuse.
  • High accident rate among ambulance drivers

    Fort Lauderdale News and Sun-Sentinel series shows high accident rate among ambulance drivers in city.
  • Inflated cost of repairs of public vehicles

    Newport News (Va.) Daily Press finds cost of repairs of public vehicles inflated in that city.
  • Beaver Valley 1: A Troubled Giant

    Beaver County Times series shows that a nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania is worse than all others but one in terms of safety.
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. The link between support spending and graduation rates appears to be stronger than other oft-mentioned factors to explain low rates for students of color. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • Detroit museum lends art to public officials for years

    Detroit Free Press series shows Detroit museum lends art to public officials for years, making it unavailable to the public; some art works are deteriorating.
  • How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.