Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • VA doctor deceives veterans and violates guidelines

    Kansas City Times finds doctor at Veterans Administration hospital in Leavenworth, Kan., deceives some veterans participating in a study and violates VA guidelines.
  • CIA Torture, a Senate Investigation, and the Google Search That Launched a Spying Scandal

    In December 2014, the US Senate released the executive summary of its long-awaited 6,700-page report on the CIA’s torture program. The heavily redacted document answered some questions—but it raised far more. In January 2015, VICE News set out to reveal more about both the CIA’s program and the Senate’s investigation of it. But we faced a daunting task: covering the story in the face of intense secrecy at the CIA, the Department of Justice, the White House, and Congress. We needed to figure out how to report a story when no sources were willing to go on the record—or, in many cases, to speak to us at all. VICE News found a way, producing a series of 10 groundbreaking and exclusive investigative reports that succeeded in closing the books on many of those unanswered questions surrounding the CIA’s torture program and the Senate’s investigation into it, laying bare previously unknown details about one of the darkest chapters in US history
  • Descent into Disorder

    An investigation into the state of Wisconsin's broken juvenile justice system and warning signs that were ignored for years, leaving young inmates injured and guards undertrained, overworked and largely unaccountable.
  • Cashing in on Disaster

    This investigation started with the observation that many more Floridians were receiving disaster relief funds than were actually affected by the 2004 storms. The story went on to reveal that some relatively unaffected parts of Florida received even more aid than areas that took a direct hit. Residents of Miami-Dade County got more than $21 million, though the actual damage done there was equivalent to a bad thunderstorm. Reporters found that FEMA inspectors often received inadequate training. Results from the story include a state legislative investigation into the hurricane payments and even involvement from the federal Department of Homeland Security.
  • Fall From Grace: How Buffalo's Bishop Hid Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo

    Damning documents from a confidential source were the basis for our three-part series on Bishop Richard J. Malone, which showed that Malone returned an accused child abuser to ministry after a previous bishop removed him; allowed another abusive priest to remain pastor of a wealthy parish despite multiple abuse allegations; and deceived the faithful by hiding the "real" abuse list -- containing more than 100 priests -- from the public.
  • Hidden suffering, hidden death

    The deaths of severely disabled Illinois residents who lived at home cared for by friends and relatives were not being investigated by the state agency specially created to protect them — the Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Human Services. The reason given for not investigating?The agency's internal documents showed that that OIG considered the dead to be "ineligible for services," even when victims died shortly after being hospitalized on an emergency basis and after the agency had received calls on its hotline alleging that the disabled person had been abused or neglected. The Belleville News-Democrat's wide-ranging investigation initially focused on the deaths of 53 of these home bound disabled adults.
  • The Real Death Valley

    Over the past five years, the remains of more than 400 migrants have been recovered in in rural Brooks County, Texas, some 70 miles north of the Mexico border. Yet no news organization had investigated why these deaths were occurring. Our investigation showed that stepped up border enforcement, interior border checkpoints, a lack of federal funds to support local law enforcement, inadequate emergency water supplies, and inadequate 911 emergency response by the U.S. Border Patrol contributed to this dramatic spike in deaths in what has become one of the deadliest migrant corridors in the American Southwest.
  • Food Plight: Cafeteria Inspections Reveal Critical Health Violations at New York City Schools

    Our reporters scoured reams of health inspection records and discovered that nearly half of New York City public school cafeterias were hit with at least one critical violation in 2017. A closer look found that the four dozen schools with the worst inspections records largely serve some of the city’s poorest students. The most sickening cases include schools where 600 rodent droppings and 1,500 flies were found in food preparation and consumption areas – conditions that are breeding grounds for potentially dangerous food-borne illnesses. Our team of students conceived of the story and used the data, obtained from the New York City Health Department under New York’s Freedom of Information Law, to create a filterable interactive graphic that parents can use to uncover details of violations found at their child’s school.
  • Culture of Resistance

    The Seattle Time analyzed millions of computerized hospital records, death certificate and other documents to track the swath of one of the nation's most widespread, and preventable, epidemics. In its investigation, the Times gained access to state files that revealed 672 previously undisclosed deaths attributable to the infection. The Times also found that in Seattle's largest public hospital, some patients who are infected with contagious MRSA are roomed with non-infected patients because of overcrowding. In at least a dozen cases, the Times proved that death certificates were inaccurate or incomplete when it came to MRSA.
  • Denied Justice

    “Denied Justice” exposed widespread failings in how Minnesota’s criminal justice system investigated and prosecuted sexual assault cases, depriving victims of justice, endangering the public and allowing rapists to go unpunished.