Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.
  • "School of Hate"

    In her article "School of Hate," Contributing Editor Sabrina Rubin Erdely exposes a history of institutional intolerance in the heartland that helped lead to a rash of LGBT teen suicides. The article delves into a harrowing crisis within Minnesota's largest school district, Anoka-Hennepin. Located in Michele Bachmann's congressional district, evangelicals prevailed upon the school board to squelch any mention of homosexuality in the classroom, instituting a policy which became dubbed as "No Homo Promo." The policy helped foster an extreme climate of fear and hate, which led to LGBT students being relentlessly bullied and isolated -- and in the span of two years, nine district students would take their own lives in a frightening "suicide cluster." Erdely's deeply reported look at the lives of these teens, the policies that contributed to their deaths and the efforts of some community members to fight back against the forces of ignorance and hate creates an article of stunning impact which not only haunts the reader well after finishing, but also helped bring about swift change.
  • VA nursing home quality revealed

    A rolling, joint investigation of Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home quality that pressured the agency to release internal ratings and data the agency had kept secret for years, depriving veterans and their families of potentially crucial health care information.
  • Seafood From Slaves

    The Associated Press team uncovered a slave island and relentlessly exposed horrific labor abuses in Thailand's $7 billion annual seafood export industry. During their year-long investigation, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza and Esther Htusan tied seafood caught and processed by trapped workers to the supply chains of almost every major U.S. retailer including Wal-Mart, Kroger, Sysco and Nestle. The reporters used images from space to track down runaway slave ships in Papua New Guinea and dug up loopholes in federal law allowing imports to continue unchecked. When Thailand¹s government said the abuses all occur in foreign territory, the journalists focused on factories just outside its capital, Bangkok where they found children and poor migrants locked inside and forced to peel shrimp. Tapping AP colleagues in all 50 states and eight countries, they documented how those seafood supply chains spread around the world. http://interactives.ap.org/2015/seafood-from-slaves/?START=freedom https://vimeo.com/151181618 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IeJOnCQlj0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgYgAVQG5lk&feature=youtu.be
  • The Force Report

    A 16-month investigation by NJ Advance Media that found New Jersey's system for tracking police force is broken, with no statewide collection or analysis of data, little oversight by state officials and no standard practices among local departments. Two decades ago, officials envisioned a centralized database that would flag dangerous cops, preventing unnecessary injuries and costly excessive force lawsuits. But that database was never created. So we built it.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • Empty-desk epidemic

    For years, Chicago officials published upbeat statistics that masked a crisis in the city's schools: Nearly 32,000 of the city's K-8 grade students — or roughly 1 in 8 —miss a month or more of class per year, while others simply vanish from school without a trace. This devastating pattern of absenteeism, which disproportionately affects African-Americans and children with disabilities, came to light only after Chicago Tribune reporters dug it out during a years-long FOIA battle to obtain internal district data.
  • The Echo Chamber

    A comprehensive examination of the Supreme Court’s secretive appeals process reveals how a cadre of corporate lawyers wields extraordinary, outsized influence.
  • War crimes and corruption in Yemen

    A collection of stories from AP correspondent Maggie Michael’s groundbreaking investigations of corruption, torture and other war crimes in Yemen.
  • Uncivil Action - A Town Left to Die, Asbestos: Forgotten Killer

    The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that "From 1924 until 1990, miners extracted a large percentage of the world's vermiculite from a mountainside near Libby (Montana). As they mined and milled the ore, millions of tons of tremolite asbestos were released into the air... 192 people from Libby had died, and 375 were currently diagnosed with fatal asbestos-related disease, directly traceable to the mining operation. ... The W.R. Grace Co., which owned the mine for three decades, was well aware of the deadly asbestos being inhaled by the miners and their families, but for years did not tell its workers of the hazards... And doctors say the people of Libby will keep dying for decades..."