Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Insult to Injury: America’s Vanishing Worker Protections

    Driven by big business and insurers, states nationwide are dismantling workers’ compensation, slashing benefits to injured workers and making it more difficult for them to get care. Meanwhile employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ comp insurance since the 1970s. http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-benefits-by-limb http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-comp-reform-by-state https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workcomp-company http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-premiums-down http://www.npr.org/2015/03/05/390930229/grand-bargain-in-workers-comp-unravels-harming-injured-workers-further
  • Black drivers bear brunt of citations from routine stops by St. Anthony PD

    After the fatal police shooting of Philando Castile during a traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, MPR News set out to investigate whether black drivers were disproportionately stopped by the law enforcement agency involved with Castile’s death. MPR analyzed thousands of traffic citations in a five-year period from the St. Anthony police department and focused our investigation on stops in which police had the most discretion to pull someone over. They expected to see some level of racial disparity, but the results were staggering.
  • Records: Illegally cast ballots not rare

    The Atlanta Constitution looks at the existing and the potential scope of voting errors and fraud in Georgia. The investigation finds that "the actual number of ballots cast by the dead is fairly small - 5,412 in the past 20 years," but "the ranks of potential dead voters have grown dramatically in recent years." The story analyses the most common errors in voting records and the loopholes in some election laws. The report also describes the voter identification requirements.
  • Perversion of Justice: How a future Trump Cabinet member gave a serial sex abuser the deal of a lifetime

    Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown and visual journalist Emily Michot documented how a politically connected mulitmillionaire manipulated the criminal justice system to avoid significant punishment for his obsessive pursuit of sexual encounters with underage girls. Through behind-the-scenes emails, the journalists also demonstrated the remarkably cozy relationship between defendant Jeffrey Epstein's powerhouse legal team and state and federal prosecutors, including U.S. Attorney Alexander Acosta, who is now President Trump's labor secretary. And, in a first, they tracked down and interviewed several of Epstein's victims.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Alabama's "Beach House Sheriff"

    Over the past decade, Etowah County Sheriff Todd Entrekin has turned the jail he operates in rural Alabama into a vehicle for his own enrichment. In 2018, AL.com investigative reporter Connor Sheets single-handedly exposed the pattern of exploitation and cost-cutting behind Entrekin’s financial success. This investigation revealed extensive wrongdoing by Entrekin, from improperly pocketing millions of dollars worth of public funds and mistreating inmates in his jail to spending public money on campaign ads and allegedly having sex with underage girls.
  • Dove of oneness: Snared by a cybercult queen

    This investigation exposed a grifter who solicits donations on the Internet to help spread the word about what she claims is a secret law that abolishes income taxes, forgives mortgages, zeroes out credit cards and declares peace. Although she has not broken the law, she moves frequently, hides behind cyber-pseudonyms and forwards her mail to post office boxes. She proclaims her interest as only promoting world peace but has links to an investment scam that robbed thousands of people out of millions of dollars and ultimately landed its creator behind bars.
  • Investigating the Economic Structure Behind the Moldovan Regime

    Oleg Voronin is the richest man in the Republic of Moldova. Scoop reporting uncovered a massive mafia-like network which Oleg used to seize businesses and operate them for profit. Opposition was silenced through swift and quiet violence, media manipulation and threats.
  • Trapped in Gangland

    The Central American gang MS-13 accounts for 1 percent of U.S. gang murders. But when Donald Trump became president, he seized on the gang’s violence on Long Island to promote tougher immigration policies. This series, co-published with New York magazine, Newsday, The New York Times Magazine and This American Life, showed how Trump’s bungled crackdown on MS-13 burned informants, deported young immigrants suspected of gang involvement on flimsy evidence, and failed to prevent further murders. Based on a year and a half of difficult and dangerous reporting, ProPublica reporter Hannah Dreier’s stories persuasively depicted how an entire subculture of Latino teenagers came to be trapped between the gang and the government.
  • Out of Balance

    A nine-month investigation by The Indianapolis Star found 368 gymnasts had alleged sexual abuse over the last two decades at the hands of coaches and other authority figures — and revealed why: USA Gymnastics, the sport’s national governing body, failed to protect young athletes by employing a policy of dismissing many child sex abuse allegations as hearsay; declining to report allegations to police; failing to track abusive coaches who move from gym to gym; denying responsibility for oversight; and, in some cases, pressuring alleged victims to remain silent. The reporting also emboldened more than 60 women to come forward with allegations of sexual abuse against a longtime USA Gymnastics team physician, who now faces state and federal charges.