Extra Extra

GET THE EXTRA EXTRA RSS FEED

Stay up on the latest examples of in-depth projects, enterprise and breaking news with impact and use of public documents or data from all media. Chrome users should download this extension.

 

 

With veto power, Rick Perry influenced, targeted and vexed

Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s history shows his recent and controversial use of the veto isn’t the only time he’s used the power for political reasons.

Perry, who faces pending charges over his veto threat to a district attorney after her drunk driving arrest, has a long and complex history with the veto, according to a story in The Austin American-Statesman.

In Virginia, thousands of day-care providers receive no oversight

Day-care providers existing on the unregulated side of Virginia’s two-pronged child-care industry operate largely in an environment short on rules. By keeping their operations to five children or less, providers avoid licensing and regulations, training requirements, inspections and background checks.

The result: Of the at least 60 children who’ve died in Virginia child-care homes since 2004, 43 were in unregulated establishments.

Read the full story from The Washington Post here.

Reports to child protection agencies overlooked in Minnesota

A flawed system of investigating suspected child abuse and neglect has contributed to a disturbing statistic in Minnesota. Since 2005, 54 children have died from maltreatment despite reports to child protection agencies indicating that the kids could be in danger, according to a special report from the Star Tribune.

The story follows the case of Eric Dean, who died at age 4 after various daycare workers and others had filed a combined 15 reports of suspected abuse, only one of which was shared with local authorities.

Tacoma police using surveillance device to sweep up cellphone data

The Tacoma Police Department apparently has bought — and quietly used for six years — controversial surveillance equipment that can sweep up records of every cellphone call, text message and data transfer up to a half a mile away, according to The News Tribune.

You don’t have to be a criminal to be caught in this law enforcement snare. You just have to be near one and use a cellphone.

Officials initially told the Tacoma City Council that the device would be used to find and prevent improvised explosive devices, but an assistant police chief later said it has never been ...

Read more ...

Data breach mystery leads from Arizona counterterrorism site to China

Lizhong Fang, a Chinese national and computer programmer, had access to a variety of sensitive information during his short time at the Arizona Counter Terrorism Information Center in Phoenix. His work on facial recognition software allowed him to view the Arizona driver’s license database as well as law enforcement records.

Fang disappeared in 2007, and those responsible for hiring him say the privacy of up to 5 million people has been compromised. Officials never disclosed the possible privacy breach.

Read the story by The Center for Investigative Reporting and ProPublica.

Politicians' food tab takes $14.5M bite from donations

House members and candidates have spent at least $14.5 million of their donors' campaign contributions on food since Jan. 1, 2011, a USA TODAY analysis shows.

The expenses range from thousands of dollars to underwrite big fundraising lunches in their home districts to meal tabs at country clubs, glitzy New York hotels and Washington steakhouses. Politicians and their aides also spent donors' money at far less glamorous destinations, such as Dunkin' Donuts and Five Guys Burgers and Fries.

Extra Extra: Ferguson deep dives, nursing home inspections, penalties for speeders

St. Louis County police forces often don't reflect communities | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

No known agency tracks the racial makeup of police departments, so the Post-Dispatch contacted 36 St. Louis County police departments in cities where at least 10 percent of the population is African-American. In 30 of the 31 communities that responded, the percentage of black residents is higher than the proportion of black officers.

 

Darren Wilson’s first job was on a troubled police force disbanded by authorities | The Washington Post

The small city of Jennings, Mo., had a police department so troubled, and with so much tension ...

Read more ...

Till death do us part: A look at deadly domestic violence in South Carolina

More than 300 women were shot, stabbed, strangled, beaten, bludgeoned or burned to death over the past decade by men in South Carolina, dying at a rate of one every 12 days while the state does little to stem the carnage from domestic abuse.

It's a staggering toll that for more than 15 years has placed South Carolina among the top 10 states nationally in the rate of women killed by men. The state topped the list on three occasions, including this past year, when it posted a murder rate for women that was more than double the national ...

Read more ...

How local, national media are investigating police militarization, shootings

Officer-involved shooting analysis tracks Coachella Valley trends | The Desert Sun

Over the past month, The Desert Sun studied more than 100 Riverside County police shootings, using public records to identify officers who have pulled the trigger in more than one incident. The Desert Sun conducted this first-ever analysis of regional police records in order to understand the frequency and circumstances of police shootings.

The analysis found that three Coachella Valley officers have fired a gun in the line of duty more than once since 2009.

 

Widespread militarization of Illinois police forces uncovered by ...

Read more ...

Local police involved in 400 killings per year

Nearly two times a week in the United States, a white police officer killed a black person during a seven-year period ending in 2012, according to the most recent accounts of justifiable homicide reported to the FBI.

On average, there were 96 such incidents among at least 400 police killings each year that were reported to the FBI by local police. The numbers appear to show that the shooting of a black teenager in Ferguson, Mo., last Saturday was not an isolated event in American policing.

Read the USA TODAY story here.