Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



  • Collapse of Care

    The project examined how Dr. Tariq Mahmood and his rural Texas hospital chain escaped punishment over the last four years despite endangering patients and committing potential fraud.

    Tags: hospitals; fraud; regulatory agencies; Texas Secretary of State oversight system

    By Miles Moffeit and Brooks Egerton

    The Dallas Morning News

    2013

  • 'Totalitarian' culture and pay questions at Upstate hospital

    This story delves into the culture and questionable contracting and compensation practices among senior staff at a major state-run teaching hospital in Syracuse, N.Y. that is also the city's largest employer. It was revealed the president of the State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University and University Hospital was being compensated by two hospital contractors that nearly doubled his state salary.

    Tags: state run hospitals; 990; MedBest; Upstate University Hospital; State University of New York; audit; radio

    By Reported by: Ryan Delaney, WRVO; Edited by: Catherine Loper, WRVO and Matthew Leonard, Innovation Trail

    WRVO Public Media

    2013

  • Prisoners of Profit

    HuffPost Business reporter Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption, Kirkham uncovers firsthand stories from those on the inside.

    Tags: juvenile justice system; prisons; juvenile prisons; corruption

    By Chris Kirkhan; Andrei Scheinkman

    Huffington Post

    2013

  • All Politics Is Racial

    “All Politics Is Racial” is a thorough examination of the first mayoral term of James McGee, the town of Vinita Park's first black mayor. His election – which he was accused of stealing -- was a direct reflection of 60 years worth of larger economic and societal forces at work in the north St. Louis County region. By the time I began my reporting there, the city had already paid out three-quarters of $1 million to a group of fired, white police officers who say they were run out of the town's tiny department and replaced with black officers. Additional lawsuits – including one for sexual harassment -- are pending. Through extensive interviews and document searches, I attempted to piece together what is really going on in this tiny hamlet.

    Tags: race; politics; government

    By Jessica Lussenhop

    Riverfront Times (St. Louis)

    2013

  • The Magnitsky Affair

    The Magnitsky project uncovered how nearly a billion dollars that disappeared from the Russian treasury ended up in offshore accounts, paper companies and apartments in New York City to the benefit of two privileged Russians and their associates. The Russian government had maintain that tracing the lost money was impossible because important records had been lost in what they described as an accident. They never tried, but OCCRP reporters painstakingly combed through hard-to-obtain bank records, land records and other documents to trace the money as it was hidden, transferred and laundered. The project has sparked investigations in a handful of countries, won numerous journalism accolades and has kept alive the memory of Segei Magnitsky, the Russian lawyer turned whistleblower who paid with his life for trying to expose the corrupt theft of tax money in Moscow.

    Tags: russia; money; corruption; government

    By Mihai Munteanu; Roman Anin; Paul Radu; Drew Sullivan

    Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (Sarajevo)

    2013

  • Newark Archdiocese priest scandals

    More than a decade after the nation's Roman Catholic bishops pledged at a landmark gathering in Dallas to remove sexually abusive priests and to usher in a new era of transparency, The Star-Ledger found the promise rings hollow in the Archdiocese of Newark. Over seven months, Star-Ledger reporter Mark Mueller wrote more than two dozen front-page stories showing how Archbishop John J. Myers, and to a lesser extent Trenton Bishop David O'Connell, mishandled abusive priests. The coverage led to national headlines and decisive action, including the appointment of a co-archbishop in Newark, the sacking of the vicar general (second in command of the archdiocese), the arrest of a priest, the suspension of another and the reassignment of three pastors.

    Tags: priests; church; religion; abuse

    By Mark Mueller

    Star-Ledger (Newark, N.J.)

    2013

  • How Washington Starves Its Election Watchdog

    Born in the Watergate scandal’s ashes, Congress created the Federal Election Commission as a bulwark against political corruption and champion of transparency and disclosure. But a six-month investigation by the Center for Public Integrity, "How Washington Starves Its Election Watchdog," showed the agency is so fractured by partisan politicking and bereft with staffing and funding woes that it is “rotting from the inside out.”

    Tags: fec; politics; funding

    By Dave Levinthal; John Dunbar

    Center for Public Integrity

    2013

  • Yarnell Hill Fire Investigation

    Investigative reporting by John Dougherty in Phoenix New Times demonstrated that multiple errors by the state of Arizona and the city of Prescott contributed to the deaths of 19 wild-lands firefighters in last summer's Yarnell Hill blaze. The revelations published in the Yarnell Hill fire articles came from information obtained through public-records requests and from well-placed sources. The original story discovered that a multitude of mistakes were made by state and local officials in fighting the fire, errors that contributed to the deaths of the 19 forest firemen at Yarnell Hill. The second story came after Prescott's wild-lands chief, in charge of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, alleged multiple misstatements of fact in the first story. This resulted in the correction of three errors, though no major finding of the original piece was proved wrong. (It should be noted that officials refused specific comment repeatedly before the original story was published, only coming forward later in an effort to dispute New Times' reporting.) The third story showed how a Forestry Division-commissioned report on the tragedy – which found that no official did anything wrong – was seriously flawed. Indeed, experts termed it a “coverup.” The fourth article examined an occupational-safety report supporting the paper's findings regarding state ineptitude at Yarnell Hill. The Forestry Division was fined more than $500,000 because of its flawed management of the fire, and lawsuits against the Forestry Division and Prescott's are in the works by families of the slain firefighters.

    Tags: wildfire; firefighters; fire; government; foia

    By John Dougherty

    Phoenix New Times

    2013

  • Outdoors grant investigation

    The investigation detailed how a handful of political insiders engineered a $500,000 hunting and fishing grant in perpetuity for some of their friends and political supporters. The taxpayer-funded grant from the state of Wisconsin went for teaching and promoting the sports of hunting and fishing, but the newly created receiving organization, the United Sportsmen, didn’t have any experience doing that work. Instead, the group had been doing political work and lobbying, often for goals at odds with those of some other outdoors groups, such as supporting a massive proposed pit mine in an area used by hunters and anglers. In spite of that, lawmakers wrote the grant qualifications to exclude more experienced groups and target their ally, which had the support of one of the state’s wealthiest and most influential campaign donors. In doing so, the lawmakers knowingly but surreptitiously put at risk millions of dollars in federal conservation funds for Wisconsin.

    Tags: corruption; taxes; politics; lobbying

    By Patrick Marley; Jason Stein; Paul A. Smith

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    2013

  • For The Record: Unrestricted Warfare

    For The Record investigated whether the 2008 U.S. financial crisis may have been caused at least in part by economic terrorism – the intentional infliction of economic damage on U.S. markets. The theory was investigated by a report commissioned by the Pentagon, which the Defense Department later sought to marginalize. For The Record spoke with former high-level Pentagon officials who said that the report was quashed because it didn’t “fit the narrative” being pushed at the time.

    Tags: finances; financial crisis; economics; economic terrorism

    By Joe Weasel; Ryan Cost; Nick Jones; Ward Hiney; Tom Orr; Kate Wilke; Brian Bosche

    TheBlaze

    2013