Resource Center

Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364573-882-3364  or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.



Search results for "Federal Government" ...

  • Smart ALEC Oregon

    A team of KBOO reporters carried out a six-month investigation researching, cataloging and analyzing Oregon legislation which has been influenced, or created by, the American Legislative Exchange Council, (ALEC). ALEC states that their organization is "the nation’s largest, non-partisan, individual public-private membership association of state legislators...which works to advance the fundamental principles of free-market enterprise, limited government, and federalism at the state level." KBOO volunteer investigative reporters reviewed hundreds of Oregon state legislative activities, and interviewed dozens of state legislators and lobbyists, to uncover ALEC influences.

    Tags: oregon; legislature; partisan; state

    By Don Merrill; Yana Maximova; Sam Smith; Mike Klepfer; Sam Bouman

    KBOO-FM

    2014

  • Contract to Cheat

    Contract to Cheat told an overlooked and poorly understood story of a construction industry dominated by companies willing to cheat on the backs of laborers and honest competitors. Using payroll records submitted for federally funded projects, reporters in eight McClatchy papers, the company's D.C. bureau and ProPublica examined the extent of the problem and exposed the government regulators who let it happen.

    Tags: industry; labor; competition; cheat; payroll

    By Mandy Locke

    McClatchy Newspapers

    2014

  • Using Jailed Migrants as a Pool of Cheap Labor

    The U.S. government is the nation's single largest employer of undocumented immigrants. This was the startling discovery of a 7-month investigation into a little-known program that allows the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency to employ these immigrants and pay them a $1 a day or less to perform most of the jobs running the 250 federal immigration detention centers around the country. This finding was even more striking considering the number of undocumented workers involved -- more than 60,000 per year -- and the amount of money the federal government saves and private prison companies make (at least $40 million annually) as a direct result of being allowed to pay these people so far below the minimum wage, or about 13 cents per hour.

    Tags: migrant; illegal; labor; cheap; undocumented

    By Ian Urbina

    New York Times

    2014

  • The Invisible Threat

    This series reveals a threat that seeps into every nook and cranny of the United States. The country's network of natural-gas distribution lines, which is distinct from interstate transmission lines, covers almost 1.3 million miles of pipeline, some of it dating to the 1800s, Accidents involving those lines have killed more than 120 people, injured more than 500 others and caused more than $775 million in damage since 2004, a Tribune-Review analysis of federal records shows. Yet the location, age and safety of more than a million miles of those pipelines remain shrouded in secrecy. Not even government regulators and emergency responders have pipeline maps.

    Tags: natural; gas; interstate; lines; injuries

    By Mike Wereschagin; Stephanie Strasburg; Andrew Russell; Bob Newell; Denise Shean; Jim Wilhelm

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    2014

  • Adoption Subsidy

    Because of a confusing tangle of bureaucratic rules, adoptive parents in New York City continue to receive monthly government subsidies even after sending their adopted children back to foster care or kicking them out onto the street. The subsidy is meant to encourage parents to adopt "hard-to-place" children out of foster care and to provide for the children’s care. But in the event that an adoption does not work out, the city’s children services agency will not cut off the subsidy even when it learns that the parents are no longer caring for their kids, blaming restrictive state and federal rules for its inability to act. This means, as one NYC Family Court judge said, that a child in foster care “would not have enough money for a winter coat while their parents were getting a thousand dollars a month from the city.”

    Tags: bureaucracy; subsidies; foster care

    By Nick Nehamas; Glenn Bain; Barry Paddock

    Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism/New York Daily News

    2014

  • Cashing in on Congressional Connections

    The Better Government Association investigated the lobbying business of a recently retired Illinois congressman, Jerry Costello, who represented a downstate district along with transportation interests as a member of key transportation committees. The investigation found that in his first year out of Congress, Costello lined up lucrative clients. He received $10,000 a month to lobby for Boeing, whose interests as a government contractor he promoted while in Washington, and $7,000 a month to lobby for a transit district that benefited from his help in securing millions of dollars in federal funding.

    Tags: congressman; Boeing; corruption; federal funding

    By Chuck Neubauer; Sandy Bergo

    Chicago Sun-Times

    2014

  • Crossing Alone

    When the influx of children from Central America across the southern border made news last summer, the national media descended on Texas. But Houston Chronicle reporter Susan Carroll was already investigating the federal government's sprawling - and secretive - shelter network for unaccompanied children. She found the small agency tasked with their care unaccountable and overwhelmed. Children were being subjected to sexual and physical abuse, and their attackers were escaping federal prosecution.

    Tags: abuse; child; Central America; Texas

    By Susan Carroll

    Houston Chronicle

    2014

  • Diplomatic Drivers

    Driving more than 100 mph. Hit and runs. Multiple DUIs. They were all considered classified state secrets until Tisha Thompson spent six years successfully fighting for diplomatic driving records never before released to the public. You can’t drive anywhere in Washington, DC without spotting the distinctive red and blue tags of foreign diplomats. In 2008, Thompson filed a FOIA with the US Department of State requesting driving records of any diplomat pulled over for violating our local traffic laws. Several years later, she was told her FOIA had become “one of the oldest, if not the oldest” in the agency’s system because it could be a potential diplomatic relations problem. Thompson used a combination of traditional and creative ways to get FOIA information not just from the federal government but also from a long list of local and state jurisdictions. And the results were stunning.

    Tags: diplomats; traffic; violations; us department of state

    By Tisha Thompson; Steve Jones; Rick Yarborough; Mike Goldrick

    WRC-TV NBC4 Washington

    2014

  • The Informant

    A former FBI informant goes public and takes KMOV deep inside a federal corruption investigation. the documentary uses previously unreleased wiretaps and undercover FBI video to show how the informant collected the evidence required to send a local mayor, police chief and streets superintendent to prison. The KMOV investigation digs deeper. It delves into the personal story of the informant and show how he used his personal relationship with the mayor to gain his confidence. In addition, KMOV obtained copies of FBI field reports that were not public documents and not presented in court. These reports showed that information provided by the informant was often wrong, though the informant insisted he provided the information required to obtain convictions. The KMOV investigation also discovered that the informant was hired as an auxillary officer and never obtained the certification required to become an officer.

    Tags: FBI; informant; local government; unqualified

    By Craig Cheatham

    KMOV (St. Louis, MO)

    2014

  • Below The Radar

    Mario Diaz exposed several of air traffic controllers returning to FAA towers or control centers with little or no accountability shortly after being a contributing factor to a deadly crash. As detailed in the series of “Below The Radar” reports, these crashes resulted in 104 deaths. The litigation produced from several of these crashes came at a steep price to American taxpayers. Diaz uncovered public records (Department of Treasury and Federal judgements) indicating that the Federal Government made either verdict or settlement payments in excess of $100-million dollars to the estate of the victims --- including the estate of the pilots involved in these crashes.

    Tags: air traffic controllers; FAA; accountability; taxpayers; deaths

    By Mario Diaz; Tom Miuccio; Amy Waldman; Dave Scanlon; Zack Smith; Ken Evsaroff; Eddie Lebron; Kenton Young; Noreen Lark; Macario Hernandez; Dan Mannerino; Jared Barnett

    WPIX-TV (New York)

    2014