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The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "constitutional challenge" ...

  • Sex Appealed: Was the U.S. Supreme Court Fooled?

    The author proposes that the U.S. Supreme Court was fooled into basing it's decision in Lawrence v. Texas on Right to Privacy grounds. But, Law says, those grounds actually did not exist because the arrests were invited. This discrepancy is important, because the Lawrence case set a precedent for privacy cases regarding same sex marriage, adoption, employee benefits, etc.

    Tags: court; judge; sodomy; homosexuality; same sex marriage; constitution; constitutional challenge; police; privacy; legal precedent

    By Judge Janice Law

    None

    2005

  • City's Handling of Homeless is Challenged

    In a series of articles, Kohler and his colleague Tim O'Neill chronicle the city's attempts to use a municipal court order to round up homeless people and require them to clear streets of trash without actually charging them with any crime. After the first article, the city reversed its policy and eventually the court order was ruled unconstitutional by state and federal courts.

    Tags: Civil rights; bill of rights; constitutional law; abuse of law; human rights

    By Jeremy Kohler;Tim O'Neill

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    2004

  • The Honor System

    Three-part investigation into the Broward County judicial system. "Judges are supposed to be elected by the voters," the article begins. "But politics and a system that gives incumbents life and death power over potential challengers help to shut out the people." While the Florida constitution demands judges be elected, more than half of Broward's 65 judges "first were appointed to their jobs." And when elections did take place, "judges up for reelection ran unopposed 129 out of 138 times" over the last 10 years. More troubling, it seems nobody is keeping an eye on them. The committee assigned to oversee Broward judges has only filed 14 complaints since 1970 (e.g. one judge drew a pistol in a crowded courtroom). Says one defense attorney: "Where else do you find a job like this? Nowhere. They're untouchable, and it's frightening." The series investigates who the judges are, where their campaign financing comes from, and who is influential in picking them. Issues of diversity (or lack of it) on the bench are also discussed. Short profiles on each judge and each member of the nominating committee are included. Also included is a list of campaign contributions from lawyers.

    Tags: judge; judicial; broward; judicial oversight; judicial appointment; south florida; lawyers; campaign contributions; courtroom; election

    By Barbara Walsh

    Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

    1994

  • No title (id: 9867)

    San Diego (Calif.) Union-Tribune reveals major flaws in the city of San Diego's minority contracting programs; finds that the city failed to crack down on white-owned companies that didn't hire minorities but also challenged the constitutionality of its program and threw it out, July - December, 1993.

    Tags: CA Cantlupe Traitel 50 pages

    By None

    San Diego Union-Tribune

    1993