Resource Center

Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364573-882-3364  or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.



Search results for "criminals" ...

  • Crime In Punishment

    The story comes from a 1 1/2 year long investigation into Tennessee prisons, where WSMV found such corruption and outrageous behavior inside the state penal system that lawmakers, a district attorney, former employees and crime victims feel that crimes were committed during the punishment of criminals. The investigation led to the disciplinary actions on more than 70 inmates, a criminal investigation by the TBI, a criminal conviction of a guard and a legislative hearing. The investigation initially began by showing the outrageous behavior of criminals inside prison, and expanded to expose the state deleting records of assaults on guards and inmates and medical neglect of female inmates.

    Tags: inmates; tennessee; district attorney; punishment

    By Jeremy Finley; Brittany Freeman; Jason Finley

    WSMV-TV (Nashville, Tenn.)

    2014

  • Tracking Troubled Brokers

    In a broad investigation, the Journal revealed that Wall Street’s own national watchdog doesn’t make public all the regulatory red flags it has about brokers. The Journal dug up and analyzed the employment and disciplinary history of more than 550,000 of the nation’s stockbrokers. Reporters found a wide array of regulatory breakdowns. The Journal revealed that more than 1,500 people had violated rules requiring them to disclose criminal charges or bankruptcies to investors. Reporters also found more than 50,000 brokers had failed a key entrance exam – sometimes as many as a dozen times – and that those who repeatedly failed had worse disciplinary records. And the Journal identified 16 “hot spots” across the country where large numbers of troubled brokers congregate, often near elderly and wealthy investors – and showed how state securities regulators do little to target resources on these problem areas.

    Tags: stockbrokers; entrance exam; discipline; failures

    By Jean Eaglesham; Rob Barry

    Wall Street Journal (New York)

    2014

  • A death in restraints after ‘standard procedure’

    The series revealed the needless deaths of three mental health patients at Bridgewater State Hospital, a medium-security state prison for men who have come in contact with the criminal justice system, due to the use of four-point restraints. The series also raised questions about the decision by a district attorney to not pursue criminal charges in one of those deaths, even though it was ruled a homicide. In addition, the series exposed the systemic, illegal use of isolation and four-point restraints -- strapping a patient’s wrists and ankles to a bed -- at a time when officials at similar institutions in other states were sharply reducing their reliance on these tactics, finding that they are physically dangerous and psychologically harmful.

    Tags: hospitals; prison; restraints; patient deaths

    By Michael Rezendes

    Boston Globe

    2014

  • Campus Confidential Informants

    Student journalists in Professor Steve Fox's Investigative Journalism & The Web class uncovered that the University of Massachusetts Amherst police use confidential informants, potentially putting students' safety at risk. Officers were allowing students to avoid campus and criminal consequences for drug offenses in return for becoming police informers, allowing some students to conceal dangerous drug habits from their families. After months of investigation, student journalists Eric Bosco and Kayla Marchetti reported that a UMass student who agreed to become a confidential informant to avoid a drug arrest, died of a heroin overdose. Publication of the student's death lead prosecutors to reopen the investigation into the overdose death after the student's mother gave them the name of the student she believes provided him with the drug.

    Tags: University of Massachusetts; drugs; overdoses; informants

    By Steve Fox; Eric Bosco; Kayla Marchetti; Scott Allen

    Boston Globe

    2014

  • Nazi Social Security

    Dozens of suspected Nazi war criminals and SS guards collected millions of dollars in U.S. Social Security benefits after being forced out of the United States, an Associated Press investigation found. The payments, underwritten by American taxpayers, flowed through a legal loophole that gave the U.S. Justice Department leverage to persuade Nazi suspects to leave the U.S. If they agreed to go, or simply fled before deportation, they could keep their Social Security, according to interviews and internal U.S. government records. Social Security benefits became tools, U.S. diplomatic officials said, to secure agreements in which Nazi suspects would accept the loss of citizenship and voluntarily leave the United States.

    Tags: Nazi; Social Security; Justice Department; loophole; FBI

    By David Rising; Randy Herschaft; Richard Lardner

    Associated Press

    2014

  • Subsidized Squalor

    The residents of Richmond’s public housing had given up. They used to speak up when things got bad. But they’d long ago stopped believing anyone would listen. They resigned themselves to sharing their bedrooms with cockroaches and bedbugs and ceding their common areas to criminals. Deep down, the frustration simmered. It finally came spilling out with fury after The Center for Investigative Reporting’s Amy Julia Harris exposed the squalid conditions in Richmond public housing, giving those residents the voice they’d lost.

    Tags: public housing; housing

    By Amy Julia Harris; Corey G. Johnson

    Center for Investigative Reporting

    None

  • Court Donations

    In recent years, defendants in Germany like Bernie Ecclestone have paid hundreds of millions of Euros to close criminal proceedings. Judges and prosecutors hand out the largest portion of this money – with hardly any oversight. This lack of transparency makes the system susceptible to corruption. We want to change it.

    Tags: Corruptions; Europe; Courts

    By Jonathan Sachse

    CORRECT!V

    2014

  • State Department Cover-Up?

    CBS This Morning reported on allegations of a cover-up inside the State Department and revealed a practice by high level management at the agency of sweeping cases of alleged criminal behavior by employees under the rug. At the center of our story was an internal Inspector General (IG) memo obtained by CBS News that described in detail eight cases of alleged criminal misconduct where investigations were either never launched or halted by senior State Department officials. The author of the memo was upset that both senior State Department management as well as the IG’s office was not acting on the quashed criminal investigations.

    Tags: State Department; criminal behavior

    By John Miller

    CBS News

    2013

  • Indian Drug Company Investigation

    The first part of our story profiled a whistleblower who exposed massive fraud at Ranbaxy, a multi-billion dollar Indian generic drug company that sold adulterated drugs to millions of Americans for years. The company sold these drugs to millions of Americans while lieing to the FDA claiming the drugs worked and could fight such life threatening illnesses like cancer, AIDS, diabetes and infections. The second part of our story revealed that despite the company’s claims, the company has ongoing serious manufacturing problems. In fact, just two weeks after CBS left a Ranbaxy plant in India, the FDA banned all finished drugs coming into the US from Ranbaxy. However, our story also revealed that while the FDA banned all finished drugs, the company is still continues to make the key ingredients for drugs sold to Americans today– including such popular drugs as Astra Zeneca’s Nexium. At the center of our story was the whistleblower, Dinesh Thakur, who had never done a television interview. The risks that Thakur took in exposing his company led to a massive federal false claims lawsuit that aided the federal criminal investigation and rewarded Thakur with $49 million. According to one federal agent who worked on the case for seven years, without Thakur “there would have been no investigation and no criminal conviction.” We were alarmed to find in our reporting that so many of the key players in the federal investigation had made personal decisions based on what they learned to never take a Ranbaxy drug. Three Justice Department attorneys, six former Ranbaxy employees, one former FDA criminal investigator and two Congressional investigators (Democrat and a Republican) all told CBS News that they would never take a Ranbaxy drug, nor would they allow a family member to do so. Each shared with us personal anecdotes of finding Ranbaxy drugs in family members’ medicine cabinets or receiving a prescription at a drug store only to tell the pharmacist that they must have a different brand. For this reason we felt strongly that it was important to notify our audience of the risks with this company. We also informed our audience that foreign drug makers are not subject to the same strong oversight that drug makers in the US face every day. For example, drug makers in the US face unannounced inspections. Despite efforts to beef up foreign FDA inspections, foreign companies are still notified in advance of upcoming inspections. In the US there is one FDA inspector for every 9 phamaceutical facilities. In India there is one FDA inspector for every 105 facilities. CBS News also tracked down half a dozen other former Ranbaxy employees who told CBS what they witnessed at the company both in the United States and in India. Two top employees went on camera to share their experiences.

    Tags: None

    By Patricia Shevlin

    CBS News

    2013

  • Always Open

    The report on the prison Viamão - shows the lack in the prison system of Rio Grande do Sul and Brazil. Recordings made by a prison guard last year , reveal that inmates leave prison and enter the house anytime you want . Blatant still shows the armed power of the criminal - that should be confined in the cells leaving only with legal authorization to work . They boast pistols, revolvers and submachine up.

    Tags: Brazil; Rio Grande do Sul; prison

    By André Azeredo, Jefferson Pacheco, Tiago Ornaghi, Luciano Lucas, Cláudio Fernandes, Ênio Rosa, Giancarlo Barzi, Grégori Bertó, Guto Teixeira, Marcelo Cabral, Gerson Antunes, Diego Vieira

    TV Globo

    2013