Resource Center

Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364573-882-3364  or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.



Search results for "criminals" ...

  • A center and its director

    This entry explored the criminal, clerical and political past of the man chosen to lead The Desmond Tutu Center at Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary.

    Tags: Bulter University

    By Ryan Lovelace

    The Butler Collegian

    2013

  • In The Name Of The Law

    This 5-part series examines the secrecy surrounding police misconduct in Hawaii and the effect that lack of disclosure has on the public. In1995, after local college journalists had fought and won a court battle to gain access to police disciplinary files, the politically powerful statewide police union convinced the Legislature to keep the records out of public view. We wanted to explore the effects of this major public policy decision and, nearly 20 years later, determine if police and other government officials were doing a good job overseeing misconduct and ensuring that the public was being protected from bad cops. Since the public can’t scrutinize police behavior themselves, we wanted to see what safeguards are in place so we can be confident our police officers, with their extraordinary power over ordinary citizens, are professional and competent. It turns out that police officers throughout the state are regularly disciplined for egregious offenses -- violence, lying, even criminal convictions. But there’s no way to know if they are being effectively disciplined, and it appears police administrators are at the mercy of strong union contracts. Local police commissions and prosecutors either ignore serious cases or can’t do anything about them under the current system.

    Tags: None

    By Nick Grube; Patti Epler

    Honolulu Civil Beat

    2013

  • The Untouchables

    In the aftermath of the financial crisis, Americans demanded to know why no Wall Street banks or senior executives had faced criminal charges. Critics questioned whether, in the midst of a painful recovery, Wall Street was simply “too big to jail.” With the five-year statute of limitations approaching, FRONTLINE producer Martin Smith sought answers to these questions in the film The Untouchables: an investigation into whether the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) failed to act on evidence that Wall Street knowingly originated, packaged and sold toxic home loans that poisoned the global economy.

    Tags: Wall Street; Recession

    By Sophie Gayter

    Frontline

    2013

  • Bad Chemistry: Annie Dookhan And The Massachusetts Drug Lab Crisis

    In August 2012, a drug testing laboratory in Boston was closed by the state of Massachusetts. Initial reports simply stated the shutdown was because a chemist working in the lab ‘failed to follow testing protocols.’ In the months that followed, state officials alleged that the chemist — Annie Dookhan — had not just mishandled criminal evidence but had falsified drug results by deliberately tainting and mixing evidence in tens of thousands of criminal cases. As of this writing, the state has provided what it says is a ‘master list’ of affected cases, and puts that number at roughly 43,000. However, recent court filings question the accuracy of that number. WBUR didn’t want to just follow the latest twists and turns of this story, we wanted to understand how one chemist could cause such a chain reaction that stretched to all corners of the criminal justice system. We wanted to pursue an iterative investigative journalism approach - to show our work mid-process, use data-driven analysis and be transparent about what we didn't know. To date, WBUR is the only news organization to have published an analysis of the testing data.

    Tags: Drug testing

    By Tiffany Campbell

    WBUR-FM (Boston)

    2014

  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.

    Tags: Supplements; Criminals

    By Alison Young

    USA Today

    2013

  • Child Abuser

    When we got a call from a distraught family member telling us that a Navy officer had been found by a city agency to have sexually abused two of his children, but the Navy looked the other way, it seemed unlikely. When the family member told us that the officer's wife had been fined $5,000 and held in contempt of court for trying to call attention to the matter, we assumed the caller had to be mistaken. It took more than six months of reporting to nail down those troubling facts. In the meantime, the mother and children became homeless. Since the story ran, there has been an outpouring of money and a criminal investigation has been opened.

    Tags: Sexual abuse; Navy; homelessness

    By Bill Sizemore

    Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk

    2013

  • Guilty & Gone

    In America’s most dangerous city, a WXYZ-TV investigation revealed a systemic problem in Michigan’s largest court: what amounts to a “get out of jail free” card for criminals guilty of attempted murder, armed robbery, rape, peddling drugs and assaulting police officers. These reports have prompted lawmakers to consider changes to state law.

    Tags: police; prosecutors; prison; judges; Michigan; broadcast; murder; armed robbery; rape; drugs; assault

    By Ross Jones; Ann Mullen; Randy Lundquist; Ramon Rosario; Johnny Sartin

    WXYZ-TV (Detroit)

    2013

  • Crime and Punishment

    The Chicago Reporter developed a first-of-its-kind series of data-driven stories shedding light on the country's third largest criminal courts system. Each of these stories were built on/based on the same database: More than 11 years’ worth of court records for Cook County. The data set was so rich that we spun it into a series of stories over the year. Collectively, they put consistent picture emerged that put pressure on the judges, police, lawmakers and elected officials who control the criminal justice system.

    Tags: data; Cook County; judges; police; lawmakers; elected officials; criminal justice system

    By Angela Caputo

    The Chicago Reporter

    2013

  • Ranbaxy

    Dirty Medicine is the inside story of long-term criminal fraud at Ranbaxy, the Indian drug company that makes generic Lipitor for millions of Americans.

    Tags: India; drug company; Dirty Medicine; fraud; Ranbaxy; generic Lipitor; federal criminal counts

    By Katherine Eban

    Fortune

    2013

  • Private Prisons

    The Palm Beach Post uncovered a little-understood aspect of Florida’s criminal justice system running roughshod over taxpayers and inmates alike. Against a backdrop of state-approved secrecy, documents detailing security lapses and basic prison operations were routinely hidden from public view.

    Tags: Florida; criminal justice system; prison; taxpayers; inmates; human rights abuses; nonprofit; politcis

    By Pat Beall

    Palm Beach Post

    2013