Resource Center

Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364573-882-3364  or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.



Search results for "criminals" ...

  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.

    Tags: Supplements; Criminals

    By Alison Young

    USA Today

    2013

  • Child Abuser

    When we got a call from a distraught family member telling us that a Navy officer had been found by a city agency to have sexually abused two of his children, but the Navy looked the other way, it seemed unlikely. When the family member told us that the officer's wife had been fined $5,000 and held in contempt of court for trying to call attention to the matter, we assumed the caller had to be mistaken. It took more than six months of reporting to nail down those troubling facts. In the meantime, the mother and children became homeless. Since the story ran, there has been an outpouring of money and a criminal investigation has been opened.

    Tags: Sexual abuse; Navy; homelessness

    By Bill Sizemore

    Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk

    2013

  • Guilty & Gone

    In America’s most dangerous city, a WXYZ-TV investigation revealed a systemic problem in Michigan’s largest court: what amounts to a “get out of jail free” card for criminals guilty of attempted murder, armed robbery, rape, peddling drugs and assaulting police officers. These reports have prompted lawmakers to consider changes to state law.

    Tags: police; prosecutors; prison; judges; Michigan; broadcast; murder; armed robbery; rape; drugs; assault

    By Ross Jones; Ann Mullen; Randy Lundquist; Ramon Rosario; Johnny Sartin

    WXYZ-TV (Detroit)

    2013

  • Crime and Punishment

    The Chicago Reporter developed a first-of-its-kind series of data-driven stories shedding light on the country's third largest criminal courts system. Each of these stories were built on/based on the same database: More than 11 years’ worth of court records for Cook County. The data set was so rich that we spun it into a series of stories over the year. Collectively, they put consistent picture emerged that put pressure on the judges, police, lawmakers and elected officials who control the criminal justice system.

    Tags: data; Cook County; judges; police; lawmakers; elected officials; criminal justice system

    By Angela Caputo

    The Chicago Reporter

    2013

  • Ranbaxy

    Dirty Medicine is the inside story of long-term criminal fraud at Ranbaxy, the Indian drug company that makes generic Lipitor for millions of Americans.

    Tags: India; drug company; Dirty Medicine; fraud; Ranbaxy; generic Lipitor; federal criminal counts

    By Katherine Eban

    Fortune

    2013

  • Private Prisons

    The Palm Beach Post uncovered a little-understood aspect of Florida’s criminal justice system running roughshod over taxpayers and inmates alike. Against a backdrop of state-approved secrecy, documents detailing security lapses and basic prison operations were routinely hidden from public view.

    Tags: Florida; criminal justice system; prison; taxpayers; inmates; human rights abuses; nonprofit; politcis

    By Pat Beall

    Palm Beach Post

    2013

  • Nazi Past

    It was a sensational find by AP reporters David Rising and Randy Herschaft _ a suspected Nazi war criminal living in the United States, hiding in plain view for more than six decades. More than just a low ranking foot soldier, suspect Michael Karkoc was an officer who commanded a combat company responsible for civilian massacres, and a founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion _ and had never before come across authorities' radar. In an eight-month investigation with reporting in more than a half dozen countries and documents in five languages, the two were able to put together evidence so solid that it has led to criminal investigations in Poland and Germany, and not officially confirmed investigations in the United States and Ukraine, with Germany already recommending that prosecutors pursue murder charges against Karkoc. Rising and Herschaft were able to prove Karkoc lied to American officials when he immigrated to Minnesota in 1949, saying he never served in the military during the war _ which has been enough in similar cases for a Nazi war crimes suspect to be deported. But the investigation went much deeper, with the two uncovering details from eyewitnesses, wartime documents and Cold War-era archives firmly establishing not only that Karkoc's unit massacred civilians, but that he specifically gave the order to attack a village in which more than 40 men, women and children were gunned down and burned in their homes.

    Tags: nazis

    By Randy Herschaft; David Rising

    Associated Press

    2013

  • Cops. Cash. Cocaine.

    Rather than chase drug dealers out of town, police in the city of Sunrise invited them in. The suburban South Florida town has no great cocaine trafficking problem, but police found that selling kilos of the drug, at a discount, could make them millions. The Sun Sentinel exposed the undercover operation and provided a unique look at how far one local police department would go to use forfeiture laws to seize cash and assets from criminal suspects. Many of the deals took place in and around family restaurants, such as TGI Fridays, near the town’s main attraction, a sprawling outlet mall. Police often engineered the stings with the help of a professional lady informant. The newspaper found the city had paid her more than $800,000 over five years to target individuals and draw them into Sunrise. Cops working the stings had a financial incentive too: they made considerable overtime from forfeiture funds.

    Tags: police; drugs; cocaine; trafficking

    By Megan O'Matz, John Maines, Susan Stocker

    Sun-Sentinel

    2013

  • Together Forever: Unforeseen tragedies forever bind best friends

    This was an enterprise story about two young women who were best friends since childhood who died tragically within a few months in 2012. Our story included fire inspection reports, police reports, legal filings, interviews with friends and family members and the heart-wrenching audio from a 911 call in the aftermath of a house fire that killed the first young woman. The reporting found that one young man was blamed by fire inspectors for causing the fire, but he was not criminally charged.

    Tags: fire; deaths

    By Nate Rau

    The Tennessean

    2013

  • Hospital Freeloader

    Our investigation started with a tip from an insider at an Ohio State University Hospital. Here’s what we uncovered: A homeless immigrant with an expired Green Card, and violent criminal past, making that hospital room his home for more than two years and counting. Our investigation learned Francis Kirton received kidney dialysis a few times a week. It’s an expensive out-patient procedure. We wanted to know why Kirton was allowed to literally live at the hospital, who picked up the tab, and why an immigrant with expired papers hasn’t been deported. Also, we wanted to know if there were other Francis Kirtons keeping house at Ohio hospitals. Getting answers to those questions was difficult. What we discovered was mind-boggling.

    Tags: hospital; immigration

    By Tom Sussi; Drew Jones

    WSYX-TV (Columbus, Ohio)

    2013