Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "hedge-fund" ...

  • Daddy's Girl

    Reporter Kelly Cramer tells the story of Bruce McMahan and Linda Schutt, a father and daughter who carried on an incestuous sexual relationship in the late 1990s and were married in 2004. Schutt was the biological daughter of McMahan, a rich Wall Street hedge fund manager. She was put up for adoption at birth by her mother. Schutt searched for her real father, and the pair connected in 1990 when Schutt was 21. Eight years later, they began their relationship, which lasted until she was married, and picked up again a few years later, resulting in the marriage of father and daughter.

    Tags: Bruce McMahan; Linda Schutt; incest; adoptive parents; Wall Street

    By Kelly Cramer

    New Times (Broward - Palm Beach, FL)

    2006

  • Al's Secret Admirers

    This story looks into irregularities and violations in Al Sharpton's campaign finances. Sharpton set up a meeting between two fund-raisers and a New York city official to arrange investments; Sharpton was caught on tape by the FBI for soliciting $25,000 from the fund-raisers. The story showed that Sharpton wound up on of the men's corporate payroll with a $25,000 salary. It also found reported donations that appear to never have occurred.

    Tags: campaign finance; Federal Election Commission; Al Sharpton; corruption; hedge funds

    By Jarrett Murphy

    Village Voice (New York)

    2005

  • Cerberus: What's Bigger than Cisco, Coke or McDonald's

    Hedge funds are buying many major American companies. Hedge funds are very secretive and refuse to release much information about their management teams or investments. But, this investigation took on the challenge of exposing the world's most secretive and voracious hedge fund acquirer of companies: Cerberus Capital Management.

    Tags: corporation; corporate takeovers; business ethics; finance economy; hedge funds; Cerberus Capital Management

    By Emily Thornton;Joseph Weber;Susan Zegel;Lorraine Woellert;Hiroko Tashiro

    Business Week

    2005

  • All Bets Are Off: How the Salesmanship And Brainpower Failed At Long-Term Capital

    The Journal tells the story of Long-term Capital Management LP, an institutional investor with 25 PhDs on its payroll, whose largest bets failed in one single day. The company lost more than 90 percent of its assets before it was bailed out by large Wall Street banks. What happened "forced many of the world's institutional investors to redefine the ways they manage risk and triggered calls for tougher regulation of hedge funds, those freewheeling investment funds that cater to the wealthy."

    Tags: investors; bond market; securities; business; corporations; banking

    By Michael Siconolfi;Anita Raghavan and Mitchell Pacelle

    Wall Street Journal (New York)

    1998

  • The Fallen Financier

    Ken Lipper wanted to be a big wheel in Hollywood and New York. But he may be remembered most for the collapse of his hedge fund empire--and losses for the rich and famous.

    Tags: Ken Lipper; financier; hedge funds; Lipper & Co.; SEC; FBI

    By Marcia Vickers

    Business Week

    2002

  • The Money Trail

    The Wall Street Journal looked at donors who contributed the maximum of $5,000 to Sen. Trent Lott's GOP PAC to see who donotes the big money in politics and why they do it.

    Tags: campaign finance; politics; PACs; hedge funds; SEC

    By Greg Hitt;Phil Kuntz

    Wall Street Journal (New York)

    1998

  • Stadium Naples (2000)

    "This entry builds on 3 1/2 years of coverage about a web of corrupt dealings involving county commissioners, a defunct golf stadium development, county grants, the PGA Tour, a boiler room stock house and our local state attorney. ... In 2000, Barron's magazine raised questions about the investment claims of David Mobley, a hedge fund manager and Stadium Naples original primary financier. We added to the coverage by confirming that Mobley's trading records had been seized, within weeks he confesed cheating investors out of $60 million to federal regulators." FOIA material used for this report is also included. Also please go through file #16064, and #15021for the complete set of stories.

    Tags: Bill Rasmussen A.S. Goldmen investment scheme fraud cronyism state ethics commission zoning land-use issues

    By Gina Edwards

    Daily News (Naples, Fla.)

    2000

  • Hedge Funds Are Hot Again

    Business Week; through a cover story and a handful of sidebars; looks at the risks and pluses of hedge funds. "Hedge funds; private pools of capital limited in most cases by law to no more than 100 investors; are no longer the exclusive stomping grounds of the rich and famous. The not-so-wealthy are getting into the game; too."

    Tags: Capital management; Hedge funds; Economics

    By Marcia Vickers;Debra Sparks;Heather Timmons

    Business Week

    2001