Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "information" ...

  • Who’s the Grossest Grocer in New York?

    In our “Grossest Grocer” series, Patch journalists uncovered dozens of grocery stores that could sicken the communities we serve, and made a vast database of state records available to the wider public for the first time. To find New York supermarkets with a history of food safety problems and tell their stories, we exclusively obtained a state database of inspection records through a Freedom of Information Law request and protracted negotiation with the state. Our editors spent months analyzing millions of violations observed by state inspectors, conferring with experts, and verifying our finds with on-the-ground reporting. We published more than 70 articles in this series, and an interactive map with detailed data on all of New York’s retail food stores -- more than 33,000 businesses, from corner bodegas to major grocery chains.

    Tags: groceries; stores; supermarkets; grocery stores; food safety

    By Martin Burch; Henry Powderly; John Ness; Matthew Hogan; Kevin Zawacki

    Patch.com

    2013

  • Drilling for Billions

    This series of stories focuses on the potential economic boost and environmental impact of extracting oil from Monterey Shale in Central California. To explore the topic 17 News traveled to western North Dakota to examine the impacts of their shale revolution. Experts in the piece explain the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing or fracking is used in shale booms. We explore the practice as it is done in California speaking with engineers on the forefront of exploration. According to industry, KGET is the only station ever allowed to speak with Central California industry engineers about the widely talked about oil completion practice used everyday in our community. 17 News was also granted unprecedented access to AERA Energy's exploration department taking a look at information even those in the industry are not privy to.

    Tags: environment; oil; fracking

    By Katey Rusch; Grant Simpson; Katey Rusch; Grant Simpson; Steve Womack

    KGET-TV (Bakersfield, Calif.)

    2013

  • The Forgotten Dead

    Columbia College Chicago students spent a year investigating unsolved homicides in Chicago, determining that police repeatedly failed to follow department policy that required detectives to have occasional contact with murder victims' families. Despite numerous roadblocks - including being denied even basic information about dozens of homicide cases and police officials refusing to be interviewed - students were able to give voice to the families and friends of homicide victims.

    Tags: Homicide; police; murder

    By Suzanne McBride

    ChicagoTalks, AustinTalks, WBEZ (Chicago Public Radio) and the Chicago Sun-Times

    2013

  • VA Legionnaires' Outbreak

    An announcement by the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System in late 2012 about a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak that killed five people and sickened 16 others there was reported by local, state and some national media largely from the officially presented account. But editors and reporters at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review felt the announcement raised more questions than it answered. A team of reporters assembled to dig deeper into what went wrong. An investigation led to a series of stories during 2013 that exposed a broken health care system rife with testing errors and what appeared to be an almost deliberate failure to inform the public. In fact, the Trib revealed top VA officials reaped thousands of dollars in performance bonuses that were awarded just before the public announcement. The Trib documented that the VA’s problems extend beyond the Pittsburgh system. Nationwide, the newspaper found the deaths of at least 21 veterans in the past year appear to be linked to failures in VA medical care.

    Tags: Health care

    By Luis Fabregas

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    2013

  • Brian Ross Investigates: A Murder, A Mobster and the FBI

    This story started as a local news investigation into a stolen car but quickly revealed a tale of corruption inside the federal government, with national implications. We found a former Russian mobster, operating a thriving luxury car business in Florida, had been accused of various crimes by consumers - but that those crimes were not pursued by local police. In looking further at Mani Chulpayev, we found he had been a highly-regarded government informant, snitching on those in the Russian crime world. In return, it appeared he was being given a pass for crimes he continued to commit himself. As a result, the FBI has launched an investigation into the agent who was Chulpayev's handler for years. And Chulpayev now awaits trial for what prosecutors say was his role in the murder of a local hip-hop artist, amid allegations that the murder investigation had stalled for a year due to his handler's interference.

    Tags: FBI; Mani Chulpayev

    By Brian Ross

    ABC News

    2013

  • Pest Control: Syngenta's Secret Campaign to Silence Atrazine's Critics

    These stories detailed a secret campaign by Syngenta, the Swiss agricultural chemical giant, to spy on and discredit critics of atrazine, its highly profitable weed killer, used on three-quarters of all the corn grown in the United States. The main story was based on roughly 1,000 pages of documents under court seal that 100Reporters obtained under the Freedom of Information laws and a review of financial and other statements of nonprofits that defended and supported use of the herbicide. The company at the time faced a class action lawsuit over contamination of drinking water in six states, and maintained that the cost of clean-up could end atrazine sales in the United States.

    Tags: Atrazine; Agriculture; Syngenta

    By Diana Schemo

    100 Reporters

    2013

  • Money, Power and Transit

    This ongoing inewsource investigation into a public transit system that serves 12 million passengers a year by bus and rail exposed perils to public safety, mismanagement of millions of public dollars and perhaps most egregious: enduring bureaucratic arrogance in the face of public scrutiny. Over the course of a year, inewsource produced more than 30 stories, radio broadcasts, TV features, and interviews. We experimented with new levels of transparency in our reporting and storytelling. We spent thousands of dollars pursuing public information and battling regular retraction demands. The series drew from a multitude of inside sources, leaked documents, hard-fought public records, emails, and other materials to unearth the truth about what’s going wrong inside the San Diego’s North County Transit District. Our stories have drawn intense fire from the district’s legal department — all the while those responsible to the taxpayers and the transit riders have consistently refused to respond to interview requests or to answer specific written questions.

    Tags: Transit; San Diego; safety

    By Brad Racino

    inewsource

    2013

  • Public Salary project

    This entry consists of stories culled from a massive request for government compensation from hundreds of government agencies, cities, counties, school, college and special districts. This projects follows the money. The data is made public through data bases on our web sites and culled through by investigative reporter Thomas Peele, who roots out stories from deep in the data, including ones about secret pension boosting perks, officials paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for not working, government managers sitting on huge banks of unused vacation time to cash in at retirement, part-time elected officials who do little work while being paid hundreds of dollars and an hour, long forgotten politicians receiving free life-time government health insurance decades are leaving office. The project routinely ferrets out information about the spending of public money that not even those in charge of government agencies are aware of until Peele tells them: "Wow,” said James Fang, a member of the board of the BART transit district when informed data showed the agencies former general manager, who had resigned two years earlier in the midst if being fired, had remained in the agency's payroll for years, raking in hundreds of thousands of dollars and jacking up her future pension. “She was still on the payroll? I did not know this. It’s startling.”

    Tags: Pension; Public employees

    By Thomas Peele

    Mercury News/Bay Area News Group

    2013

  • Conflicts of Interest at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    In a series of investigative stories that has been running for over two years, The Cancer Letter editor Paul Goldberg has been examining conflicts of interest at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, the largest cancer hospital in the world. The Cancer Letter laid bare the controversy that would have ordinarily gone unnoticed, producing real-time coverage of that institution’s efforts to create a hybrid of an academic institution and a pharmaceutical company. The web-based weekly newsletter relied on thousands of pages of internal documents obtained under the Texas Public Information Act and a network of sources at MD Anderson and throughout academic oncology and regulatory agencies. The stories informed coverage by the Houston Chronicle, the journals Science and Nature, as well as other news outlets.

    Tags: Anderson Cancer Center; Cancer

    By Paul Goldberg

    The Cancer Letter

    2013

  • 43 years, 20 properties

    According to the St. Louis County Assessor’s Office, Webster University owns 20 taxable properties in Webster Groves — 11 of which are on a street adjacent to the university. As distrust between residents and the university has grown, the reporting done by myself and a colleague provided accurate and contextual information among the rumors and hyperbole.

    Tags: Webster University; tax; housing

    By Dan Bauman; Megan Favignano

    Webster University's The Journal

    2013