Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "international custody" ...

  • Innocents Abroad

    Parents have resorted to abductions, sometimes with violent consequences, in order to gain custody of their children because the international system designed to mediate such disputes is fatally flawed. Newsday documented cases in which parents hired mercenaries to snatch back their children from foreign countries. The reporter also documented cases in which, even when courts rule that parents have the right to gain custody of their children, a jumbled legal system often prevents of delays lawful transfers for years. There are more than 1,000 American children being unlawfully held overseas.

    Tags: abduction; custody; mercenaries; child recovery; parental kidnapping; Hague Convention on International Child Abduction; U.S. Borders; recovering abducted children; child custody; Hague Treaty; international custody; International Courts; Parental Kidnapping Crime Act; FBI

    By Thomas Maier

    Newsday (New York)

    2003

  • Missing

    "The series examines the Indiana Missing Children Clearinghouse list and the errors and compelling cases it contains. The major finding in day one of the series: the names of 16 children from Northwest Indiana remained on the list for month and in some cases years, even though they were no longer missing because police were not following up in the cases... Day two of the series deals with the issue of child runaways and the limited power existing state laws give the police, courts and parents to deal with the problem. Day three... The Times learned that international law can do nothing to help return children taken to certain countries..."

    Tags: children; abduction; missing; runaways; police; courts; international law; custody battles; parents

    By Marc Chase

    Times of Northwest Indiana (Munster, IN)

    2003

  • Child Abduction Underground

    KGO-TV got a tip from a father that had failed to find his two daughters after six months of search. "He explained his ex-wife had abducted the girls during a nasty custody dispute. The mother was in jail refusing to tell the judge where she had hidden the girls." KGO was able to retraces the woman's steps and identified the group of people holding the girls. The man leading that group was a child molester, and KGO did a report about that, so the rest of the group members feared for the girls safety and took them to the TV station.

    Tags: child abduction; child abuse; molester; Grand Jury; San Francisco International Airport; TAPE; TV; TRANSCRIPT

    By Dan Noyes

    KGO-TV (San Francisco)

    2002

  • Where did the guns go?

    The untimely death of a East Baton Rouge Parish District Attorney Officer uncovered a problem with how authorities handled evidence, guns specifically. Drug prosecutor Dana Ashford died of pancreatic cancer in 1997, since that time an internal police investigation found that Ashford had been stealing weapons that were initially meant for melting at a local foundry. After his death police discovered two crates filled with guns in the former officer's home. The case also spurred an examination of how the police department deals with custody of evidence and internal investigation practices.

    Tags: Crime; police; guns; law enforcement

    By Melissa Moore

    Advocate (Baton Rouge, La.)

    2001

  • Battered cargo: The costs of the police 'nickel ride'

    An Inquirer investigation going back seven years documented injuries to 20 people tossed around in Philadelphia Police Department wagons. Two of those people were permanently paralyzed. "Most of the victims had clean records. They were arrested on minor charges after talking back to or arguing with police. Typically, the charges were later dismissed. Those wagon injuries have cost taxpayers more than $2.3 million in legal settlements, but ...no Philadelphia Police Officer has ever been disciplined for subjecting a passenger to a wild ride." These rides were reportedly part of rookie officers' street training. Furthermore, although Internal Affairs is required to investigate any injury to someone in police custody, this did not happen in 11 of the 20 cases documented by the Inquirer. The bare wagons were not equipped with safety devices, such as padding or seat belts, that have been added to police vans in other cities in recent years. Now, only 10 of the department's 86 vans have been retrofitted for these features.

    Tags: police van; Philadelphia Police Department; nickel ride; police wagons; police brutality; internal affairs

    By Nancy Phillips and Rose Ciotta

    Philadelphia Inquirer

    2001

  • Who killed John McCloskey?

    The Roanoke Times takes a look at the suspicious death of John McCloskey. The medical examiner concluded McCloskey's injuries were inflicted while he was in the custody of either the sheriff's department or the state mental hospital.

    Tags: Police brutality mental health unsolved assault criminal justice system internal investigation

    By Michael Hemphill

    Times (Roanoke, Va.)

    1999

  • The last cop story

    Columnist Mike McAlary received an anonymous tip that two white police officers had beaten and sodomized a black man, Abner Louima, in custody. The case went national and then international. Police brutality became a major political issue again.

    Tags: Police brutality; racism

    By Mike McAlary

    Esquire Magazine

    1997

  • Parents who 'kidnap': The hell moms and dads go through when ex-spouses snatch the kids

    U.S. News & World Report reports that "More than 350,000 children are "kidnapped" by a parent each year in divorce custody disputes. They are almost never charged with the crime of kidnapping, and most cases end up with minimal or no legal charges being filed. But the damage to the children can be just as severe as in the much rarer - but more publicized - instances where children are kidnapped by strangers."

    Tags: abduction police international custody dispute abuse recovery reabduction snatchback

    By Linda L. Creighton

    U.S. News & World Report

    1995